Skip to content

Forum

Notifications
Clear all

Slipping Pick

Page 1 / 2

(@dudle1977)
New Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

Can anyone give me any advice on holding my pick. No matter what I do it always seems to slip between my fingers. It doesnt actually fall out of my fingers, rather just slips forward or backwards. It feels so awkward.

Also does anyone have any advice of stopping ur right hand fingers from banging the strings when you are holding a pick?

Cheers,

Andy


Quote
 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2852
 

dudle, welcome to Guitarnoise

You should be holding it with just your pointer finger and your thumb. Also, your other fingers should not be stretched out, but in a fist-shape, this may be why they are hitting the strings.

Make a fist, but instead of tucking your thumb under your other fingers, let the meaty part of it (where your thumb print is) press against your second finger joint, it should feel pretty natural this way. Put the pick where your thumb is pressing, allowing the thumb to hold it in place.

Your other fingers should still be in a "fist" sort of form, but not SQUEEZED, or clenched, like you are angry, relax them, but keep them there.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


ReplyQuote
(@dudle1977)
New Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

Thank you very much for you advice. I will try this tonight.

Do you have any advice on the left fretting hand fingers. Ive been playing for quite a while now, but still seem to end up accidently muting strings that are supposed to be left open.

Also any advice on barre chords, I still seem to struggle with them. I find it hard to change into a barre chords (especially E major shaped ones) from other chords fast enough + I also seem to get a bit of a buzz sound when Im playing them. Is there any technique to improve my speed of changing into them. They feel very awkward and my fingers strain a lot. Surely this must have something to do with my technique. I thought after time my hands would adjust and feel comfortable in playing them, but they seem just as hard to play.

Thanks for all your help.

Andy


ReplyQuote
(@kcfenderfan)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 473
 

Do you have any advice on the left fretting hand fingers. Ive been playing for quite a while now, but still seem to end up accidently muting strings that are supposed to be left open.

Andy

Hey Andy, everyone struggles with this at first. Try to remember to arch your fingers and pay close attention to ensure that only the top of your fingertip is touching the string. What I found helpful was shaping a chord and playing each string individually. When I found a string that was muted, I would immediately try to correct the positioning of my finger until each note played clearly.

Hope this helps.

Jim-Bone


ReplyQuote
 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2852
 

Yeah, that's solid advice Jim-Bone.

Dudle, how long have you been playing for? And how long trying to get barre chords down?

Frankly, they are just tough. It takes a lot of hand/finger strength, callouses, and practice. One day it all just seems to snap, it took me a LONG time to get barre chords. The only advice I can give you is basically what Jim said, keep playing them over and over, try to get it right each time you fret the chord.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


ReplyQuote
(@ejwebb)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 54
 

I have only been playing a few months and the slipping pick was an issue for me, too. I just keep playing and i just noticed last night that it isn't slipping around like it used to. I guess it is just one of those things that happens with time.

I did experiment with lots of picks - thick, thin, textured, etc. and have found a few that I like. My favorite today is a harder medium with a bit of rubber texture on either side. Of course, I haven't really honed in on "my" pick yet and the favorite keeps changing.

Picks make a differnece but I think it is more a matter of your fingers getting used to holding it...


ReplyQuote
(@riff-raff)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 372
 

Usually, I have no trouble with my pick slipping, but sometimes my fingers get really dry and they tend to slip quite a bit especially when I'm strumming fast on my acoustic. I bought some Star Picks which have a star cut in the middle of them which is supposed to grip your finger and prevent slipping. I don't use them often, but when I find my picks slipping too much, I grab one of these.

One thing about the star picks though, they are flimsy because of the hole. If you are used to medium picks, I'd go up a little in gauge. And the really light ones tend to break easily.


ReplyQuote
(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

I've always had trouble with picks slipping, possibly because I tend to strum hard and attack the strings. The usual advice given is along the lines of "hold the pick firmly but gently." I just can't seem to manage that! In the end, I gave up and now 99% of the time I use my fingers anyway. The only thing that ever seemed to help at all was having a pick with a rough texture - that helps the grip, whether or not your hands get sweaty. If they're smooth and slippery, take a bit of rough sandpaper to 'em!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


ReplyQuote
(@brian-f)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 122
 

when I first started, the slipping pick was my nemesis. very frustrating. I thik it is just like barre chords and so many other things with guitar in that you just keep playing and it gets easier and more comfortable over time. Maybe find the pick that slips the least now, then stick with that one until the slipping stops, then you can start experimenting with other picks and really appreciating them for their different feels, tones, etc.


ReplyQuote
 cnev
(@cnev)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

personally I think it just comes down to playing more. I used to have the same problem dropping picks ALL the time and I thought I'd never get it. I tried all kinds of picks short, long, stiff flexible nothing really helped except playing more.

Eventually you'll stop dropping them and you'll never think about it again.

You can try the more flexable picks now. they help a bit when strumming.

I use a heavy(stiff) pick now exclusively and don't seem to have any problems.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


ReplyQuote
(@embrace_the_darkness)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 540
 

I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped my pick into the sound hole of my acoustic

I think that it does just come down to practice. Everyone holds their pick a different way as well (as shown in this disscussion https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=32599&highlight= ), so just find what works for you and go with it.

Pete

ETD - Formerly "10141748 - Reincarnate"


ReplyQuote
(@demoetc)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2168
 

Carry one around in your pocket and just reach in there and hold it; sort of while you're not really concentrating on it. Bring it out and hold it, turn it around in your fingers - maybe when you're sitting at work or at a desk - and it starts to become second nature.


ReplyQuote
(@dave-t)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 239
 

+1 to those who say it will come with more playing. One day you will say "hey, my pick does not slip around anywhere as much as it used to"

I had some luck going to a thinner pick (0.5mm) and easing up on the grip.


ReplyQuote
 cnev
(@cnev)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

I agree with DaveT the thinner picks do help a bit when you start out, but once you get over the dropping part any pick will do it just becomes a matter of taste.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


ReplyQuote
(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2764
 

There is another solution for you. This was given by a previous member.

Gorilla Snot.

Keep in mind that although using gripping aids ain't that bad, yet you should try to have a natural grip on standard picks (like Dunlop tortex etc). That will come with practice and a little experimentation.

Good Luck.


ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 2