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Thanks for all the help!

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popeye70809
(@popeye70809)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

I am of coarse a newbie. I got a accustic guitar 1 week before christmas and thanks to alot of you guys (alot of hours driving my wife crazy) i am already able to play "For What Its Worth" (still a work in progress) but it was a huge boost seeing my hard work pay off. I Can't believe that the lessons that David has created are free. I am just now getting over the pain in my fingers so it should start to get a little better. Now here's what i know already I am changing prety good between A,E,& D. What is another good combonation of chords i should work on or should i keep changing E'A'D but add to it? Thanks in advance.

Low rider trucks are for guys WHO CAN'T GET IT UP!


   
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ballybiker
(@ballybiker)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 493
 

a nice combo to get you going is G-Em-C-D 4/4 time straight down strumming......it'll get the fingers working and build your stamina....lots of sixties songs use that format....hope that helps

what did the drummer get on his I.Q. test?....

Drool

http://www.myspace.com/ballybiker


   
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chuckster
(@chuckster)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 938
 

Firstly, welcome to GN, popeye.

If you know E then Em shouldn't prove too difficult. :wink: G, C and D are all reasonably straight forward open chords and will open up all sorts of doors song wise. Check out the ESD - it's a gold mine.

Look forward to seeing you round the forums.

8)

I've had a lot of sobering thoughts in my time.
It was them that turned me to drink.


   
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clockworked
(@clockworked)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 214
 

Pretty much any combination of the chords A, B, C, D, E, F or G can turn into something.

Used to be, was a part of me felt like hiding.. but now it comes through. Comes through to you.


   
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TwistedLefty
(@twistedlefty)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4113
 

welcome to GN,
those chords will provide you with many songs to play

#4491....


   
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popeye70809
(@popeye70809)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Thanks the G C D combo sounds familiar for some reason. also does anyone know some leads for "For What Its Worth"?
and 1 more question since i am here. I listen to alot of Hank Williams Jr. songs i can get tabs for it but is it possable to get strumming patterns as well? just a thought thanks guys.

Low rider trucks are for guys WHO CAN'T GET IT UP!


   
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chris_skilton
(@chris_skilton)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 48
 

thought that u could buy a basic guitar chord book because i got one and it helps especially when u have found chords that u dont know on sheet music u can just flick through the book :idea: . But anyway good luck woth the chords and stuff. :D

Woot Woot!!


   
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Misanthrope
(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2261
 

Thanks the G C D combo sounds familiar for some reason.
In songs, it's not the actual chords that matter, it's the relationship between them. G, C and D are the major chords in the key of G, exactly as A, D and E are the major chords in the key of A. The chords themselves are different, but relative to each other they are the same.

If you take a song you know that uses A, D and E, and substitute G for A, C for D and D for E, then you've transposed the song two steps down - from the key of A to the key of G. If you sing along with it, you'll notice you have to sing a little lower to make it fit.

Anyway, long story short - there are millions of songs out there that use this relationship between the chords, and you'll find them in all keys which is why they sound familiar. You'll find the same for C, F and G (key of C) as well.

You might have seen chords notated as I, IV and V for instance. That's the relationship between them. To play that song in C you would use C where it said I, F where it said IV and G where it said V. To play the same song in A, you play A where it said I, D where it said IV and E where it said V.

Does that make sense?

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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popeye70809
(@popeye70809)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

If you take a song you know that uses A, D and E, and substitute G for A, C for D and D for E, then you've transposed the song two steps down - from the key of A to the key of G. If you sing along with it, you'll notice you have to sing a little lower to make it fit.
Does that make sense?

I think so... so if one can't sing in a high pitch key it can be lowered simply by playing everything in a diffrent key. Seems like that would be very noticable. This site is like a fountain of knowlege :P

Low rider trucks are for guys WHO CAN'T GET IT UP!


   
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dogbite
(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6348

   
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Misanthrope
(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2261
 

If you take a song you know that uses A, D and E, and substitute G for A, C for D and D for E, then you've transposed the song two steps down - from the key of A to the key of G. If you sing along with it, you'll notice you have to sing a little lower to make it fit.
Does that make sense?

I think so... so if one can't sing in a high pitch key it can be lowered simply by playing everything in a diffrent key.Yep, that's it.

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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margaret
(@margaret)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1675
 

Thanks the G C D combo sounds familiar for some reason. also does anyone know some leads for "For What Its Worth"?
and 1 more question since i am here. I listen to alot of Hank Williams Jr. songs i can get tabs for it but is it possable to get strumming patterns as well? just a thought thanks guys.
Sounds like you've made a lot of progress in a short time!

If you scout around on the web and look at the many different versions of tab that people post for a given song, you may find strumming patterns mentioned in the notes above or below some of those postings.

You might also find postings of the song on YouTube and be able to pick out the strum pattern from watching someone play it.

Or you can name a particular song and someone around here may be familiar with it, or able to listen to it and tell you what the strum pattern is.

Have fun!

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


   
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