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To justify lessons


(@acousticfish)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

Good morning people :D , I've read through previous posts here regarding people's lessons with or without a teacher. From what I gather most would encourage a teacher if it's possible, making the learning process faster and keeping you focused. I love the guitar and have been teaching myself since January. I began with theory and simple songs, learning my notes in the first position. Now I'm onto chords and songs like Heart of Gold. I'm still plugging along with theory but I must admit that scales are kind of intimidating . So now I'm thinking a teacher would be very helpful. I know the lessons will be kind of costly but what the hey!! Is my thinking process correct?

Thanks


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(@blueline)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1705
 

You bet! From a guitarist's perspective (are there any others?) that will be the best money you could spend. A good teacher can get you focused very quickly. With dedication on your part, you will be able to learn at a quicker pace than teaching yourself. Tell the teacher what you want to learn. A good teacher will gear the lessons towrds what YOU want to accomplish. There are many discussion about finding a good teach here on GN.

To speak to the subject of your post, the justification will only be proven if you dedicate the time towards learning by practicing and studying. That's all it really takes! :D

Teamwork- A few harmless flakes working together can unleash an avalanche of destruction.


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(@acousticfish)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

Blueline, thanks for taking the time to reply to my post. Keeping focused and not being discouraged I think are the pitfalls for home learning.


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(@nick-layton)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 12
 

Try and find a teacher who specializes in the kind of music you want to play....then just make sure they actually do :-)
I've been teaching many years and even though I specifically state what style of music I teach and play I still get all kinds of requests. You want to find somebody who is GREAT at the style(s) you love...not just mediocre.

http://www.nicklayton.com
[email protected]


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(@blueline)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1705
 

YW. A teacher is a great idea. You really can't go wrong with that approach. I am self taught. There are some good things and some bad things The Bad Thing About Being Self Taught when it comes to that. But lately I'm thinking about taking some night classes on music theory. Hope I can swing it!!

Teamwork- A few harmless flakes working together can unleash an avalanche of destruction.


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(@number6)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 152
 

Speaking as someone who's entirely self taught, if you can afford lessons and you have the time to take them, do it.

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(@acousticfish)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

All great advice. I'll be stopping at the guitar shop after work tonight to chat with the teacher. Thanks everyone.


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(@dhutson)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 157
 

Fish,

I just caught your post and the replies a moment ago. All are confirming what you already know. A teacher along with a regimented practice schedule will accelerate your learning curve.

There is one bit of advice I would like to add: the teacher works for YOU. Keep that in mind when you go to the music store to sign up for lessons. You are interviewing someone for a job. The candidate should have qualifications including, but not limited to, good communication skills, experience, and a passion for both music and teaching. Don't be impressed simply because they can wail away on the guitar better than you.

Good luck,
Dwayne

http://www.soundclick.com/wayneroberts


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

No teacher is better then a terrible teacher. A decent teacher is better then no teacher. A truly able and motivated teacher is priceless. Try to get a free lesson and see how it goes. If all is well he should try to find out what you can and can't plus figuring out what your goals are. If it goes something like that and he isn't a complete bunghole take a few lessons. Follow his instructions like he's your personal God. Do your homework as he tells you to. Do that for say, four to six lessons. Then evaluate: are you still having fun? Are you learning? Are you going in the way you want to go? If so, you've got a winner.

Sidenote: don't forget that initially you might be learning a few things you don't care about. The foundations of music contain things that might not directly be of use in your preferred kind of music. No way around it, sorry.

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(@acousticfish)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

Sidenote: don't forget that initially you might be learning a few things you don't care about. The foundations of music contain things that might not directly be of use in your preferred kind of music. No way around it, sorry.

Yeah I figured as much but thats the way it goes. I'm glad I have some knowledge under my belt going into lessons, I would be rather overwhelmed if I was starting out with a blank slate, though, I would imagine you would have no bad habits then either.


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

As someone self-taught, I say go for the lessons. They are more than worth it. I would especially encourage you to learn to sight-read (something I can't do for guitar). If you can read, you can play anything.

We have several teachers here, I forget who it was, but one of them said you will seem to lag behind self-taught players for a couple of years, but then you will pass them by and have skills they do not. I agree.

Go for it. :D

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@chris-c)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

No teacher is better then a terrible teacher. A decent teacher is better then no teacher. A truly able and motivated teacher is priceless. Try to get a free lesson and see how it goes.

I couldn't have put it better.

I've had a teacher or two who did a good job of nearly putting me off music for ever. Boring, unimaginative, and a complete waste of money. Fortunately, I've also experienced the other type too. :) It depends a whole lot on what sort of person you are, and how good a match you are with your teacher. I mostly like being 'self taught' because I usually start to want to wriggle out of the class timetable after about 4 or 5 lessons in a row. I find the pattern of one lesson a week a bit un-natural and tend to either want more or less than that.

But, having said that, I'm currently having a weekly drum lesson from a very experienced drummer who manages a local music shop and he made a point of saying (without me asking) that I can drop in or out any week, even if I just ring him a few minutes before, because he'll be at the shop anyway. I've also just found a guy who is a long time working singer and muso who is going to give me some singing lessons, and he said the same thing - just let him know if I don't feel like turning up one week. So I guess they are also the kind of people who don't like to feel their lives are too planned out in advance either. So we seem like a good fit. Some places are very strict about running to term schedules (and most teachers understandably want to have some idea if they're going to be paid next week or not) and that suits some students too. It's just a matter of finding a good match.

Chris


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