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tuning...?


(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

i know how to tune a guitar, i'm having trouble initiating it b/c i can't quite decipher the correct tone for the E string. but that's a whole separate problem, i printed out tab for the smashing pumpkins song "to sheila," and it says to tune down 1/2 step: Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb......this is probably a stupid question but how do you know how to tune it to alternate settings??


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(@nexion)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 536
 

Instead of tuning each string to the 5th fret of the string above it, tune them to the 4th fret of the string above it.

"That’s what takes place when a song is written: You see something that isn’t there. Then you use your instrument to find it."
- John Frusciante


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(@artlutherie)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1161
 

Cool song and easy to play. If you have a chromatic tuner just tune it flat. If not play it normal it's so close you can't tell.

Chuck Norris invented Kentucky Fried Chicken's famous secret recipe, with eleven herbs and spices. But nobody ever mentions the twelfth ingredient: Fear!
ChuckNorrisFactsdotCom


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(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

Instead of tuning each string to the 5th fret of the string above it, tune them to the 4th fret of the string above it.

ohh i see!! thanks for the info. can you do that for any fret on the guitar?? like what would it be if you tuned it to the 3rd fret??


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(@number6)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 152
 

Instead of tuning each string to the 5th fret of the string above it, tune them to the 4th fret of the string above it.

ohh i see!! thanks for the info. can you do that for any fret on the guitar?? like what would it be if you tuned it to the 3rd fret??

Each fret on the guitar is one half-step or semitone. There are twelve semitones in an octave. The third fret would be a whole step or whole-tone lower. A semitone is the distance between each key on a piano keyboard, the distance from white to black (or white to white in some cases).

If you wanted to go into say drop-D, and the A-string was tuned correctly, you need to tune the E-string so that the seventh fret sounds the same as the A-string. You're tuning the E-string down a whole step, so you need to move up a whole step in order to sound the note that used to be on the fifth fret.

In your case, since you want to go down a half-step from normal tuning, you can't just go with the forth fret on each string (third fret in the case of the G-string). If you tune the A-string to the forth fret of the E, then tune the D to the forth fret of the A, the D string will be a whole step lower than normal instead of a half step. Then if you repeat that on the G string, it'll be 1 1/2 steps lower than normal. You need to tune the A string to the forth fret on the E, then tune the rest of the strings as normal, starting from the A. Then just tune the E string so that the fifth fret on it sounds the same as the A.

I hope this makes sense.

The hunger site. Click once a day to give free food.


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(@flashback)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 266
 

Or just buy a chromatic tuner. :D

Im sorry I spent alot of time on ear training but you should just use that chromatic tuner so it doesnt hold you up from learning new songs! :D

Just my Opinion. Even if its not a very good one.

Later

GN's resident learning sponge, show me a little and I will soak it up.


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(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

yea i probably should b/c i'm so lost...it's hard for me b/c for some reason i can't tell whether the low E string is sharp or flat.....the technical part of guitar is killing me


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(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

You need to tune the A string to the forth fret on the E, then tune the rest of the strings as normal, starting from the A. Then just tune the E string so that the fifth fret on it sounds the same as the A.

i'm not quite sure what you mean there...

this is what it said to do on another website...

"All the strings will be tuned down to a flat. Just tune your guitar to the standard tuning, then tune the 6th fret of the top E string until it matches the 5th string (A)"

...which is obviously the same thing you said, but for some reason i can't seem to comprehend that.

instead of tuning the A string to the 6th string 5th fret like you would for standard tuning, i tuned it to the 6th fret of the 6th string...which obviously wasn't right cause the E sounded way too low when i tried to play the song.


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 lars
(@lars)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1121
 

It's been almost 4 weeks, and you still haven't been able to tune your guitar. OK - will try to help you.

You start out with a standard tuning EADGBE

Here is Nexions suggestion spelled out in detail.
Fret the low E on fourth fret (thats an Ab: 0E-1F-2F#-3G-4G#/Ab) - and tune the 5th string so they sound the same.

Then you have
EAbDGBE

Fret the fifth fret on the Ab string --> gives you a Db (Ab-A-Bb-B-C-Db) - tune the 4th string accordingly
EAbDbGBE

Fret the fifth fret on the Db string --> gives you a Gb (Db-D-Eb-E-F-Gb) - tune the 3rd string accordingly
EAbDbGbBE

Then fret the Fourth fret on the Gb string --> gives you a Bb (Gb-G-Ab-A-Bb) - tune the 2nd string
EAbDbGbBbE

Then the fifth fret on the Bb string - Eb (Bb-B-C-Db-D-Eb) - tune the 1st string
EAbDbGbBbEb
Tune the 6th string so it match the 1st string - and voila.

The other method: when you fret the sixth fret on the 1st string in standard tuning - you have a A#/Bb - If you tune that string down so the A# sounds like an A. The open string E will sound like a Eb

What you tried went in the wrong drection as you'd noticed. the sixth fret on the E string is a Bb.

Good luck - keep on asking if it's stil unclear

LaRS

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@kaizer-szoza)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 103
 

Although, I took a few lessons when I was younger I am a complete noob and have only been practicing in earnest for about a month. I myself feel I am not adept at hearing the tones as they truly should be as of yet, so in order not to worry about it and to ensure proper sound I use a chromatic tuner. I am sure this is the best way for me now and it sure takes off any unecessary frustration.

Thanks larsko for that little lesson. I will try that.


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(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

lol thanks!!! yes i'm that bad i need it broken down for me step by step


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(@blueeyez6489)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 27
Topic starter  

btw...does anyone have recommendations for chromatic tuners?? b/c i bought one a while ago and it broke on me after a few months...granted it was only $15 and apparently a piece of junk...


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