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70chevelle
(@70chevelle)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 35
Topic starter  

I've been away from the board for a while, but still playing almost every day. I finally had a set up done on my Seagull S6 GT, and has it ever made a difference. I'm finding that I can switch cords quicker, but I'm still not "musically seamless". Here is where I am. I have Heart of Gold down, and actually inserted my own chords for the verses. Off the top of my head, they go from C to G to D and then back to Em when the end of the verse goes to "heart of gold". I also have a pretty good handle on Wish You Were Here and Neil Young's Only Love Can Break Your Heart. (One of my favorites!) I also have the intro and a little of the verse down to Harvest Moon, and I also mess around with Leavin' on Jet Plane and Dylan's Blowin' in the Wind. That being said, I printed off some new tab yesterday and was playing Uncle John's Band and American Pie last nite. I could hear the tunes in my head, but my wife couldn't call out the songs, which is my internal grading system. My question comes to American Pie. Could anyone give a strumming pattern? I can hear the song in my head and the guitar, (especially when I hear Mclean get to "...did you write the book of love and do you...") but as I'm reading the tab, I basically strum according to the words. The parts that confuse me the most are when you come to the end of a verse and after the words they list two chords. I have no idea how to strum that. Any help would be appreciated.

As I've been reading up on chord transitions and such, American Pie seems to be a great practice song since it has some quick chord changes, especially from/to C & G. As I played it over & over the changes from chord to chord got better as I played.


   
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mattguitar
(@mattguitar_1567859575)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 879
 

Re American Pie - there's a version on the Easy Song Database on here, but the most useful tip i can give you is to go to Grouptherapyguernsey's website http://www.grouptherapy.guernsey.net/demos.html

go to the American Pie bit. He shows when to use single strums and when to use a "proper" strum, including sound files. Very nicely put together and highly recommended.

All the best

Matt


   
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70chevelle
(@70chevelle)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 35
Topic starter  

Yeah, I was a little upset that she "cheated" on me last nite and looked at the title. Then I get the "oh, yeah, now I hear it!" God love her!. On another note, do you run into the problem of finally playing the song well, but your spouse now hates that particular song? :lol: I started this journey with the intention of being able to entertain my family, but I don't think they want to hear the songs after they've heard them butchered over and over again. Maybe I'll sound proof a room? :wink:


   
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jimmy_kwtx
(@jimmy_kwtx)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 115
 

Yeah, I was a little upset that she "cheated" on me last nite and looked at the title. Then I get the "oh, yeah, now I hear it!" God love her!. On another note, do you run into the problem of finally playing the song well, but your spouse now hates that particular song? :lol: I started this journey with the intention of being able to entertain my family, but I don't think they want to hear the songs after they've heard them butchered over and over again. Maybe I'll sound proof a room? :wink:

I have been married for 9 years. My wife and 2 sons are always complaining that they get tired of hearing me "practice" due to the fact I will play certain songs, rifffs, licks, exercises over and over and over and over and over --you get the picture.

It seems the only time they really like to listen to me play is when I "let loose" to use their words. It seems that practicing is not entertaining to any one but the entertainee. :D


   
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matteo
(@matteo)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 557
 

Hi mate

"American Pie" uses at least three differnt strummin patterns:

a) single note strums like in the first verse (usually you strum and held the note for four beats or two beats)

b) d/du/u/du in the verse when chord change every measure (every four beats). This is IMHO the must fundamental strummin pattern to master if you want to be able to play rock and folk music. There are literally thousands of songs which employs it (or its variants like du/du/u/du or d/du/u/d)

c) d/du in the chorus and when chord change half measure

If you check the following site http://www.heartwoodguitar.com/chords.htm you could find the chord sheet with extremly detailed chord changes notation

The song in istself it is not difficult since it use some basic strummin patterns, the hardest thing is to remember all the chord changes but as everything you will get it with a few patience

Good luck

Matteo


   
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70chevelle
(@70chevelle)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 35
Topic starter  

Thanks for the links. Hopefully it will all come together soon.

Matteo - on the tab I printed from your link, it has (1/2) & (2) above the chords. Does that mean 1/2 measure and 2 measures? Thanks again.


   
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biker_jim_uk
(@biker_jim_uk)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 536
 

Don't forget
http://www.guitar.gg/americanpie.html


   
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matteo
(@matteo)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 557
 

Thanks for the links. Hopefully it will all come together soon.

Matteo - on the tab I printed from your link, it has (1/2) & (2) above the chords. Does that mean 1/2 measure and 2 measures? Thanks again.

yes, you're right. Don't forget that a full measure strum is:

d/du/u/du

while an half measure one is

d/du

you could also play the first strummin pattern and change chord on the offbeat of beat 2, but it is easier to play on the beat so go with d/du

Also i can add this small tip: since most of the chorus revolves around G, C, D chords, I use the following voicing

G chord:

E: 3rd fret, first finger
A: 2nd fret, second finger
D: don't play
G: dont' play
B: 3rd fret, 3rd finger
e: 3rd fret, 4th finger

C chord:

E: don't play
A: 2nd fret, first finger
D: don't play
G: dont' play
B: 3rd fret, 3rd finger
e: 3rd fret, 4th finger

D chord:

E: don't play
A: don't play
D: don't play
G: 2nd fret, 1st finger
B: 3rd fret, 3rd finger
e: 3rd fret, 4th finger

Matteo


   
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