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(@markthechuck)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 169
Topic starter  

when you use a capo do you treat the Capo as the top fret or Nut?? then move the chords up the neck??so if i had the capo on the first fret a A would be X03330, I HOPE YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN, :? i've just read it back and it sounds hard to understand, but i think you'll get my thinking. :D

A knock back is the beginning of a comeback!!!


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

Think of the capo as a moveable nut. Say you wanted to play Stand By Me and you were told the chords were A, F#m, D and E. You might not like the F#m, especially if you're not good with barre chords; If you put a capo on the 2nd fret, you could play G, Em, C and D - all open chords. Because you're playing them two frets higher, the G chord would actually sound like an A chord, the Em like an F#m, and so on. Treat the capo as the nut; playing a G chord with the capo on the second fret, you'd still finger it as 3 2 0 0 0 3....but because the capo's there, what you're actually playing is 5 4 2 2 2 5, which is an A chord - but you'd have a hard time playing that particular voicing of it without the capo!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

Not to blow my own horn or anything, but we've got a lot of lessons here at Guitar Noise that address all sorts of questions and do so pretty thoroughly. Here's one that can help you with capo questions:

https://www.guitarnoise.com/article.php?id=2

Don't be afraid to go to the home page and use the search engine there to find answers. Or even just go to the lessons page and look around. Not to mention using the search function here on the Forum page

Peace


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

If you play A with a capo at the first fret, you're really getting x13331 - the capo is fretting the first and fifth strings for you. That turns your A chord into a Bb chord.

A good way to think of it is "capo up, chord down". If you need a Bb chord, and you want to finger A, Bb is one fret above A. You want to move the chord down one (so you can finger A), so you move the capo up one - to the first fret.

If you wanted to play Bb by fingering a G shape, G is three frets below Bb - so you'd capo up three frets, and put it at the third fret.

Make sense?

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@markthechuck)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 169
Topic starter  

mmm?? :? :? so if i have a cappo i still play the same chords?? how would i play a "c" with a capo on the first fret?

A knock back is the beginning of a comeback!!!


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(@scrybe)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2246
 

also, if the TAB you're reading also has standard notation above, its always worth a quick glance at that, to check how whichever company/person produced the score has done the layout (i.e. if the TAB seems to say you should play an A major chord, check the standard notation is also saying play an A major chord, and not a D major chord or something else). there's one guitar mag in britain (uh, Guitar Techniques, I think) which just does standard TAB with a note at the start about where the capo goes.

so, TAB for them would say something at the start about the capo being at the fourth fret, but then the TAB would have things like....

X 0
X 2
X 2
X 2
X 0
X -

an A major chord shape according to the TAB, but actually the capo at the 4th fret makes it a D# major chord (or Eb major chord, depending on the key of the song). The standard notation would, however, be telling you to play the D# major chord.

there have been a couple of times I've tried to learn a tune quickly from them and wondered why it sounded horrible playing along to the cd they provide - I'd failed to read the bit about the use of a capo or check the standard notation.

they did have an argument for this way of doing things. I'll see if I can dig an old copy out and will post said argument if I can. I think its because it makes the TAB easier to read when it refers to the higher frets (i.e. if you're using the capo at the 2nd fret, but the tune requires you to play stuff at the 11th fret, its easier to read the TAB if it refers to the 11th fret instead of shifting fret numbers based on where the capo is placed).

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


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(@noteboat)
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Well, yes and no.... you can still play the same fingerings, but they're no longer the same chords. And you can play the same chords, but they're no longer the same fingerings.

If you've got the capo at the first fret, you've capoed up one - so your chords move down one. If you need a C chord, you'd play the chord down one fret - so you'd play a B chord.

If you play a C fingering, the capo makes it sound like C#/Db.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@denny)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 452
 

mmm?? :? :? so if i have a cappo i still play the same chords?? how would i play a "c" with a capo on the first fret?

If you mean, what fingering would sound the same as the C sounds without a capo, you would finger it like you would a B chord.

Denny


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 KR2
(@kr2)
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A good way to think of it is "capo up, chord down". If you need a Bb chord, and you want to finger A, Bb is one fret above A. You want to move the chord down one (so you can finger A), so you move the capo up one - to the first fret.
If you wanted to play Bb by fingering a G shape, G is three frets below Bb - so you'd capo up three frets, and put it at the third fret.
Excellent explanation Noteboat.
I figured out the answer to MarktheChuck's question before I scrolled down to it
because I understood your explanation.

Another way of looking at it is, if the capo is on the first fret, a C would be a C#.
So if you want a C you go down a half step. Since C down to B is a natural half step, the answer would be B.

It's the rock that gives the stream its music . . . and the stream that gives the rock its roll.


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(@markthechuck)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 169
Topic starter  

I want to go Home, :? , I'm struggling to understand this, i've got wonderwall in a chord book at home, i need to look at what chords i play, i think i'm thinking the wrong chords for that song, please bare with me i've only been playing for 7/8 weeks.. :) all part of the fun of learning the guitar i guess...i was well impressed when my wife guessed what song (wonderwall) i was playing the very first time i played it, i want to learn Photograph by nickelback and someone on the forum says use a capo, i think thats going to throw me a bit..

A knock back is the beginning of a comeback!!!


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 KR2
(@kr2)
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Well to understand it, you would need to know the half-steps.
Here are the half steps
A, A# or Bb, B, C, C# or Db, D, D# or Eb, E, F, F# or Gb, G, G# or Ab and then back to A
B to C and E to F are natural half-steps.

Everytime you move the capo up the fretboard, all the strings go up a half-step in pitch.

So a C would sound like a C# if the capo was on the first fret.
If the capo was on the 3 fret the pitch goes up 3 half steps
That would be C to C#, C# to D, D to D# (or Eb)
Meaning a C would become a D# or Eb in pitch.
Did that help?

It's the rock that gives the stream its music . . . and the stream that gives the rock its roll.


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(@scrybe)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2246
 

Wonderwall

Intro:

| F#m ' A ' | Esus4 ' F#m ' | repeat a few times

F#m......A.................................Esus4......................F#m
Today is gonna be the day that they're gonna throw it back to you

that structure repeats for each line (4 in total)

then

|Dmaj7 ' Esus4'|F#m |

2nd verse is the same as the "Today is gonna be the day" bit, but the second F#m of each vocal line changes to Bm

then, the bit which goes

.........D................E.........................F#m
And all the lights that lead us there are blinding

a bunch of times. so...........

the chords you need are F#m A Esus4 Bm Dmaj7 D E.

ok, let me just reread that and make sure its formatted ok (probs not, lol). I never played this with a capo.

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


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(@scrybe)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2246
 

um, I'd play this without a capo. if the bar chord shape is too difficult for the F#m, you can use a half barre shape (just fret the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd strings).

but I'll have a bit more of a think after I've had some food and see if I can post a capo'd version. I'm just not seeing any easy way of doing it with a capo to avoid using bar chords right now, but I might just not be focussing enough.

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


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(@slejhamer)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

I'm just not seeing any easy way of doing it with a capo to avoid using bar chords right now, .

Try this: capo on 2, keep the pinky and ring finger anchored on the third fret, and use the following chord voicings:

Em = 0 2 2 0 3 3 (really Em7 I guess)
G = 3 2 0 0 3 3
Dsus4 = x x 0 2 3 3
A7sus4 = x 0 2 0 3 3
Cadd9 = x 3 2 0 3 3
Dsus4/F# = 2 x 0 2 3 3

Only need to move your index and middle fingers.

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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(@clideguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 376
 

Damn... I'm confused???

There are TAB sites that will let you change the KEY to a song and they will display the new chords. It won't do the riff's.

BJ


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