Skip to content

Forum

Notifications
Clear all

vibrato


(@rag_doll_92)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 261
Topic starter  

what is vibrato? How to you use it?

Join the fight to stop global warming...
Join the virtual march at: http://www.stopglobalwarming.org
We CAN make a diffrence!


Quote
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

Vibrato is a slight back-and-forth change in pitch, and there are numerous ways to get it. Use the vibrato bar, slightly bend the string up and back down again, move your finger rapidly from left to right on the fret while keeping pressure etc.


ReplyQuote
(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 974
 

In case you didn't recognise what vibrato sounds like from Arjen's description - It's the warbling sound you hear when drunk people sing long notes in slow, sentimental songs.


ReplyQuote
 Oric
(@oric)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 87
 

The different ways of doing vibrato are used in different types of music, generally. For the most drastic change in pitch, I would say the whammy bar does it, and it's used a lot in rock. If you have strong fingers, bending the string up and down is good for a big change in pitch, and is more for rock and blues. The left to right I think is used more in classical music, and provides a smaller, more refined vibrato, 'cause you won't hear super-whammy vibrato coming out of an orchestra. I myself prefer to use the left-to-right, at least in my original music. I think it jsut fits my music better.


ReplyQuote
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

i have a tremolo question that's kind of related. i just bought a new strat copy with a whammy bar. i can get a whammy sound from pushing down on it, but i can barely get any play by pulling back on it. is it from the shape of the bridgepiece, or should i remove one of the springs to lower the tension?


ReplyQuote
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

Strat bridges can't really be pulled up, you need a floyd or such for it.


ReplyQuote
(@silvertone)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 15
 

sorry-


ReplyQuote
(@silvertone)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 15
 

apologies for triple dipping...


ReplyQuote
(@silvertone)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 15
 

If you have strong fingers, bending the string up and down is good for a big change in pitch, and is more for rock and blues...

for two types of vibrato. To elaborate on the type Oric mentions, if you do the vibrato like B. B. King/Clapton etc. it's not necessarily moving the string up and down using your fingers but rotating with your wrist while gripping the neck.

B. B. King's other vibrato is what's sometimes referred to as "flutter". This is a single note vibrato without bending the string up to another pitch. His technique uses a single finger anchored (like a pivot) on the note being vibrated. Thumb loosely behind the neck and the other fingers not being used are free from the neck. It's a rapid up/down vibrato that kinda "flutters."

This is also done with the whole hand free of the neck except for the finger on the note/string to be vibrated. It's hard to get this type down but when you do you'll have a distinct/strong vibrato and you'll use it the rest of your playing days.

For examples of judicial/subtle use of the vibrato/whammy bar check out The Ventures or Hank Marvin and the Shadows or Chet Atkins or Duane Eddy or Brian Setzer.

silvertone


ReplyQuote
(@voodoo_merman)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 370
 

for two types of vibrato. To elaborate on the type Oric mentions, if you do the vibrato like B. B. King/Clapton etc. it's not necessarily moving the string up and down using your fingers but rotating with your wrist while gripping the neck.

Clapton does move the string up and down. He doesnt use a wrist vibrato like B.B. :)

At this time I would like to tell you that NO MATTER WHAT...IT IS WITH GOD. HE IS GRACIOUS AND MERCIFUL. HIS WAY IS IN LOVE, THROUGH WHICH WE ALL ARE. IT IS TRULY -- A LOVE SUPREME --. John Coltrane


ReplyQuote
(@silvertone)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 15
 

for two types of vibrato. To elaborate on the type Oric mentions, if you do the vibrato like B. B. King/Clapton etc. it's not necessarily moving the string up and down using your fingers but rotating with your wrist while gripping the neck.

Clapton does move the string up and down. He doesnt use a wrist vibrato like B.B. :)

Whoops, you're right. My fluttering clarity was wobbly.

thanks for the catch-

silvertone


ReplyQuote
(@mwilliams)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 50
 

Recording your vibrato is an interesting lesson in what you think sounds good...vs. what really does. I've been messing with vibrato for a few months now during my Pentatonic runs and I thought I was nailing it. Then I listened to myself on a recording and OMG! I need to slow it down AND smooth it out.

I'm now officially a believer that this little move takes some time to cultivate.

Mike


ReplyQuote
(@rag_doll_92)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 261
Topic starter  

hey thanks EVERYONE! :)

guitarnoise rocks this was one of the fastest replies i've gotten...;)

Join the fight to stop global warming...
Join the virtual march at: http://www.stopglobalwarming.org
We CAN make a diffrence!


ReplyQuote
(@silvertone)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 15
 

just found this on YouTube. It's from the History (or was it Celebration?) of the Stratocaster. He also did a killer version of Apache. This is a great tutorial on the judicial use of the bar from the master Hank Marvin: Sleepwalk

silvertone

p.s. Here's B. B. showing his vibrato: This is how you do it

and in a full song: Rock Me Baby
I first saw B. B. King do Rock Me Baby in 1976 at Armadillo World Headquarters. It made me cry...


ReplyQuote
(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 974
 

Here's B. B. showing his vibrato:

Great link Silver. A guitar lesson from BB King - Priceless :D


ReplyQuote