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What chord is this?


(@greatwhitenorth)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

I'm trying to learn Susie Q by CCR. It's a fairly easy song I recommend learning it if you're just getting into hammer-ons. But when you look at the Rhythm Guitar part you see:

Rhythm guitar plays Em A C H Em (9Em 2A 1C 1H 3Em)

All easy chords too! Except for that one... H? Isn't there no such thing as an H chord or am I just stupid? Can someone explain that to me?

You can find a link to the tab by clicking here.


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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

You have a German music score. The Germans use the letter H for the note B and, just to confuse matters, B is what they call Bb.

The tabber is Swedish, so maybe they use it too.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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(@margaret)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1689
 

You have a German music score. The Germans use the letter H for the note B and, just to confuse matters, B is what they call Bb.

Say WHAT?!

Why H?

And why then call a Bb a B? :? Why not call it an Hb?

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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(@jasonrunguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 273
 

I learn something new everyday...looks like today it's how to play an H chord

-Jason
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To those about to rock, we salute you!
http://www.soundclick.com/jasonwittenbach


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(@margaret)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1689
 

And to think, I always told my piano kids that a note named H did not exist. "Nooo, after G it starts over with A, B, C.....in alphabetical order."

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

You have a German music score. The Germans use the letter H for the note B and, just to confuse matters, B is what they call Bb.

The tabber is Swedish, so maybe they use it too.

Yep, they do. I remember talking with a Swede about it on another board long ago.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@redneckrocker)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 174
 

Sooo.... In Germany it goes A B H C C# D D# E F F# G G# A?

~Mike the Redneck Rocker.

"The only two things in life that make it worth living are guitars that tune good and firm feeling women" - Waylon


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

no, after d, they just use people's names. hans, gruber, gruber sharp, wilhelm, etc...


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(@margaret)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1689
 

Sooo.... In Germany it goes A B H C C# D D# E F F# G G# A?
no, after d, they just use people's names. hans, gruber, gruber sharp, wilhelm, etc...

Margaret

When my mind is free, you know a melody can move me
And when I'm feelin' blue, the guitar's comin' through to soothe me ~


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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

Weeeeeelllllllllllllllll, no.

The Germans don't use "sharp" (#) and "flat" (b). They use "is" (sharp) and "es" (flat), so Gmaj would be G, A, H, C, D, E, Fis, G.

Fmaj is F, G, A, B (aka Bb), C, D, E, F.

Bb would be B, C, D, Ees, F, G, A, B (2 flats)

I sometimes think that they only keep this system because you can then play "BACH" - Bb, A, C, B.

The Germans also have a standard phonetic alphabet Anton, Berta, Cesar, Dora, Emil, Friedrich, Gustav, Heinrich, Ida, Yot, Konrad, Ludwig, Martha, Nordpol, Otto, Paula, Quelle, Richard, Siegfried, Theodor, Ulrich, Viktor, Wilhelm, Xanthippe, Ypsilon, Zeppelin.

Both J (Yot) and Y (Ypsilon) have pronounceable letter names, so there is no need to give any other name.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

I sometimes think that they only keep this system because you can then play "BACH" - Bb, A, C, B.
Bach (Johann Sebastian) used to improvise melodies with his own surname.
I thought music was an international language? Oh wait, we can only play western music...
The music is international but everyone uses different ways to name the notes. For example, we use "do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si" and the Italian people as well ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solfege ).


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(@causnorign)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 559
 

AFAIK there are several differant scales in foreign music that differ from our chromatic scale. I don't know what they are or where they come from, but they are there, somewhere. And I certainly don't know what they name their notes.


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(@kalle_in_sweden)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 780
 

Greybeard
Swedish scores is using same signs as the germans. I think it is due to the fact that historical swedish musicians was more influenced by german music than by english music.

Kalle

Tanglewood TW28STE (Shadow P7 EQ) acoustic
Yamaha RGX 320FZ electric guitar/Egnater Tweaker 15 amp.
Yamaha RBX 270 bass/Laney DB 150 amp.
http://www.soundclick.com/kalleinsweden


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(@rik-anderson)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 140
 

And why then call a Bb a B? :? Why not call it an Hb

'Cos that's a pencil :D :D

The only thing that keeps me from realising my full potential is the depressing awareness that it wouldn't take much time or effort...


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