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What Chords Do I Have?

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Ignar Hillström
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Sus4ths are guitar chords, yes? Other musicians don't recognise them?

The use of sus4 'chords' was used extensively in classical music as in F (C F A) - Csus (C F G) - C - (C E G). Actually using as chords on their own happens a lot in pop music and is probably recognized by those instrumentalists who play them.


   
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indiana_jonesin
(@indiana_jonesin)
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So let me get this straight....

A major chord is the 1,3 ,5 of that scale
A minor chord is the 1, b3, 5...so a minor7th would be 1,b3,5,b7...
A 7th chord is the 1, 3, 5, b7...whereas a major 7th would be 1,3,5,7...
A 9th chord would be 1,3,5,b7,9 whereas an add9 chord would be..1,3,5,9

A sus4th is the 1,4,5 of a chord, and is acceptable because it's been recognised as such a long time...but a sus2 is merely an inversion of a different sus4, ie Dsus2 uses the notes D E and A, whereas Asus4 uses the notes A D and E...

Sus4ths are guitar chords, yes? Other musicians don't recognise them?

There's a chord I use a lot in open G tuning....

D G D G B D
x 0 2 0 1 0....

which I use up and down the fretboard....I've seen it in quite a lot of Stones tabs, usually referred to as a Gsus4/6....I've got the 1st 4th 5th and 6th notes of the G scale.....

Is there another way to refer to this? Isn't it a Cadd9? I've got the 1st - C, 3rd-E 5th-G and 9th-D....notes of the Cscale...

I am more confused than ever now....!!!!

:D :D :D

Vic

I need a fresh glass of headache relever... :)
Next time I promise to come up with a real challenging question for you all, instead of tossing out these softballs :wink:
It just goes to show that nothing is foolproof, 'cause we fools don't read the rulebook first! :lol:

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when he gets up under the lights to play his thing..."-Dire Straits
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Misanthrope
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There's a chord I use a lot in open G tuning....

D G D G B D
x 0 2 0 1 0....

which I use up and down the fretboard....I've seen it in quite a lot of Stones tabs, usually referred to as a Gsus4/6....I've got the 1st 4th 5th and 6th notes of the G scale.....

Is there another way to refer to this? Isn't it a Cadd9?
'Tis indeed Cadd9.

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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kingpatzer
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Sus4ths are guitar chords, yes? Other musicians don't recognise them?

The use of sus4 'chords' was used extensively in classical music as in F (C F A) - Csus (C F G) - C - (C E G). Actually using as chords on their own happens a lot in pop music and is probably recognized by those instrumentalists who play them.

If you asked any of them what chords where in that structure, they would have told you that there whas an F chord and a C chord.

Suspensions themselves are considered non-harmonic tones in classical music, and a suspension is an event that takes place between consonnant chords.

I've given the traditional definition here before, but the simple reality is that Csus here Arjen would not have been talked about as a stand alone chord by a classical composser.

Suspensions are thought of more like cadences than like chords.

If you gave a classical composser the tones a Csus4, he would have told you "Oh, that's a C5 wtih a fourth ." But he would think you were odd for using it as a stand alone device and not part of the established sequence. Asked to name it what it was, a classical composer would not call it Sus4 outside of a sequence where a suspension was involved.

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Fretsource
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Sus4ths are guitar chords, yes? Other musicians don't recognise them?

The use of sus4 'chords' was used extensively in classical music as in F (C F A) - Csus (C F G) - C - (C E G). Actually using as chords on their own happens a lot in pop music and is probably recognized by those instrumentalists who play them.

The point is that they weren't called sus or sus4. C F A still isn't called sus 4. It's just F major. If they wanted to show it was in second inversion, with C in the bass, it was named 'six four' (with 6 written above the 4 - like in a time signature) - It showed that A was a sixth above the bass note and F was a fourth above.

CFG did appear often but wasn't considered a stand alone chord, and certainly wasn't called a sus chord. It was just a C major (or minor) chord that had been modified, with the F temporarily replacing the chord's 3rd, E (or Eb). or it was the note combination that occurs as the middle stage of a true suspension.

Now that the term SUS has been coined, albeit inappropriately, keyboard player's do use the terms SUS and SUS 4. As NoteBoat pointed out, artists such as Keith Emerson used them. I suspect it's more widespread among pop/ rock musicians than among classical pianists, many of whom haven't a clue what we're talking about. :lol:


   
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dsparling
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Now that the term SUS has been coined, albeit inappropriately, keyboard player's do use the terms SUS and SUS 4. As NoteBoat pointed out, artists such as Keith Emerson used them. I suspect it's more widespread among pop/ rock musicians than among classical pianists, many of whom haven't a clue what we're talking about. :lol:

I'd have to agree with that assessment. Most of the rock, pop, and jazz musicians I've worked with, regardless of their instrument, know what a sus4 (or a sus2 for that matter) chord is. Whether the term is technically correct in the sense of classical theory isn't an issue, as most of them don't have classical theory and wouldn't know the difference. On another note, I have a friend who is finishing his PhD in music and works as a church music director and organist (and does composing), he also has referred to sus4 chords, but it was always in the context of pop music.

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Ignar Hillström
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The point is that they weren't called sus or sus4. C F A still isn't called sus 4. It's just F major. If they wanted to show it was in second inversion, with C in the bass, it was named 'six four' (with 6 written above the 4 - like in a time signature) - It showed that A was a sixth above the bass note and F was a fourth above.

Thanks, but I never called it an Fsus. I just gave an example of where a Csus might be used (between F and C here). Also note that I use '' around the word chord indicating that it wasn't considered a proper chord back then. Even while they might not have named them sus4 they would most certainly recognize the sound, which is the only thing I'm saying. :D


   
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Fretsource
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[note that I use '' around the word chord indicating that it wasn't considered a proper chord back then. Even while they might not have named them sus4 they would most certainly recognize the sound, which is the only thing I'm saying. :D

Point taken Arjen. I didn't notice your "" marks.

Thanks Doug - That confirms what I thought. My own keyboard friends use the terms too, but none of them can remember where they learned them. Typical! :lol:


   
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