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What do u mean by the different scales?

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(@kenllh)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Scales are directly related to the chords in a key. Each key has 3 Major and 3 Minor Relative chords. In the key of C you have C, F, and G (the Major chords) and Am, Dm, and Em (the Minor Relative chords). These chords are made of the very notes of the C Major scale.

C Major scale= C, D, E, F, G, A, B, and back to C (octave).

Now the notes that make up the Major and Relative Minor chords in this particular key.

C= C, E, G
F= F, A, C
G= G, B, D
Am= A, C, E
Dm= D, F, A
Em= E, G, B

Now notice that all of these chords are made of the very same notes found in the C Major scale.

So let's say you play an old song in the key of C. Take the old 50's progression C, Am, F, and G. Play those chords and you will recognize this famous progression from the 50's.

Now you want to play a solo over this progression. The C Major scale will work because all of the notes match up with the notes that make the 3 Major and 3 Minor Relative chords in this particular key.

Now there are exceptions to this. You can flat some notes on purpose and this is exactly what Blues players do. They will flat the 3rd and 7th tones especially. In C the 3rd is E, so flatted would be Eb. The 7th is B, so flatted would be Bb.

So now you would have C, D, Eb, F, G, A, Bb, and C (I flatted the 3rd and 7th tones).

These two flatted tones will have a big impact on your solo. If you play the straight Major scale notes the solo will tend to sound very happy. If you play the flatted notes it will sound slightly melancholy or blue. This is the Blues.

But a scale is like the alphabet. We learn the alphabet A to Z in order. But we don't use the alphabet that way. We use the letters in many various orders to spell different words. A musical scale is the same. You learn it in order, but you do not play it that way (although you can). No, you mix the order up anyway you want to create a beautiful melody.

But the notes of a scale must generally match up with the chords you are playing over.

If you are playing over the C chord, play lots of C, E, and G notes and the listener will hear the C chord. When the progression goes to Am, then play A, C, and E and the listener will hear this minor chord. You can play any notes you want in any order, but it is good to play choice notes over chords to lead the listener's ear.

Hope that wasn't confusing.

Wes
Hi Wes,

Thanks for the long reply.

I think i understand more now. Since C Major scale = C, D, E, F, G, A, B.

Thus, C,F,G Major chords will fall into the key of C as all the chords contains all the notes of scale C correct?

But...

C= C, E, G (why not C,E,C?)
F= F, A, C
G= G, B, D (why not G,B,G?)
Am= A, C, E
Dm= D, F, A
Em= E, G, B (if i fret two notes to get Em, i would get only an E,B only..?)

Rgds,
Kenny

I fell in luv wit my G440C Takamine~ :)


   
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(@kenllh)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 58
Topic starter  

Now dat i have a better idea of what are scales, what type of scales should i learn?

Say for example if i learn the C major scale, being the easiest, do i need to learn all the different positions of the C major scale? Do i jus play from the 6th string itself the C major scale? or mayb jus the third and the fourth string? there are so many ways to play them. How should i learn, and more importantly, wat types of scales should i learn?

Rgds,
Kenny

I fell in luv wit my G440C Takamine~ :)


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

You first want to learn the major scale in all keys and all positions. Don't just learn the boxes, learn the notes. That will take a bit longer but after that everything is so much easier. When you can play the scale from any position on any number of strings you're done. After that you don't have to learn all boxes for new scales, just take the major ones and modify them, which will be easy because you'll know where the notes are. :)


   
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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

But...

C= C, E, G (why not C,E,C?)
F= F, A, C
G= G, B, D (why not G,B,G?)
Am= A, C, E
Dm= D, F, A
Em= E, G, B (if i fret two notes to get Em, i would get only an E,B only..?)

Rgds,
Kenny

C, E, C doesn't have a G note - so there isn't enough information to call it a chord. It's called a "major third" interval, and like "power chords" (which are also just intervals), it won't give you a specific major or minor sound. The notes C-E could be part of a major chord (C-E-G) or a minor one (A-C-E). Same's true of G, B, G.

If you fret two notes to get Em, you're still playing more than two strings. The "missing" G note is the open third string - you have to count all the sounds, not just the fretted notes.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 973
 

But...

C= C, E, G (why not C,E,C?)
F= F, A, C
G= G, B, D (why not G,B,G?)
Am= A, C, E
Dm= D, F, A
Em= E, G, B (if i fret two notes to get Em, i would get only an E,B only..?)

Rgds,
Kenny
If you fret two notes to get Em, you're still playing more than two strings. The "missing" G note is the open third string - you have to count all the sounds, not just the fretted notes.

Same goes for the other two shapes you questioned, Kenny. The 5 string C chord shape you thought had only CEC has actualy CEGCE, and the G chord shape you thought had only GBG, actually contains GBDGBG. As NoteBoat said, you have to take the open strings into account too, not just the ones you're holding down.


   
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(@kenllh)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 58
Topic starter  

Oh......Ok! how stupid of me.....ok now i get it....

Alrite, seems like its gonna take me quite a while to get all the major scales down...

THANKS!

Kenny

I fell in luv wit my G440C Takamine~ :)


   
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(@kenllh)
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Posts: 58
Topic starter  

Ok....questions...

What is mode? What do u mean by the different modes of the major scales?

Rgds
Kenny

I fell in luv wit my G440C Takamine~ :)


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

Using a major scale of key A in a song of key B, roughly said.

C-major = C D E F G A B
G-major = G A B C D E F#
G-Mixolydian = G A B C D E F

So if you would play in G using the notes from C-major (so not the usual F# but an F) you play in the mixolydian mode. Don't worry too much about it now, just focus on the basic major scales. If you got those and know where the notes are 'getting' modes are easy to get.


   
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(@kenllh)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 58
Topic starter  

Questions....

For the Natural minor scale G A Bb C D E F

Since its whole, half, whole, whole, half whole whole, why does the sixth note becomes E and not D#/Eb??

And for the F Major scale, is it F G A Bb/A# C D E F ??

Since its whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half?

Rgds,
Kenny

I fell in luv wit my G440C Takamine~ :)


   
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(@fretsource)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 973
 

In the G natural (and also harmonic) minor scale, the 6th note IS Eb, not E. It's E in the melodic minor.

G (natural) minor: G(w)A(h)Bb(w)C(w)D(h)Eb(w)F(w)G

And F major is F G A Bb C D E F

The 4th note is Bb - Don't call it A# in this context as the letter A has already been used for the third note.


   
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