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When to learn scales?

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(@surfbluewavesbc)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 43
Topic starter  

I have been playing since Janurary ,and know notes, and some chords. I am having a problem getting down barre chords I know how to read music, and play some chords as long as I can see what they look like . But after that what comes next? I went the music store to get some sheet music , but I dont know scales. When is a good time to learn them? And is it to early to learn them?


   
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(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1882
 

I started at the same time as you, and I'm just starting to work on a few scales. Slowly.

I started with the basic open chords, (and the first few chapters of "Guitar For Dummies") then messed around with a few tabs I found online - just for fun.
That was my first 6 months.

I have tried a couple of barre chords, but I think I'll wait a while before I tackle them head on. Just doesn't feel right yet.

I'm also starting to learn standard notation reading, and trying to memorize the fretboard.
And working thru the first book of the "Hal Leonard Guitar Method". It takes a differnt approach than the Dummies book, but the two seem to compliment each other (at least for me)

(re-reads what I just wrote... It doesn't really answer the question, does it...) :?

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


   
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(@soundgarden)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 43
 

based on my limited experience i don't think it is posible to learn scales to early i think that they should among the first thing that you learn because they improve finger dexterity and cooridination out of sight. Besides in order to play a scale you don't have to be able to fly through it even if you are playing slowly it still helps, also scales help with fretboard knowledge.
it's never to early to learn something anyway.

I started playing in early February so i have even less experience than you guys.

Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with with your self esteem. Kurt Cobain
Have you seen the roses? There's a whole lot of colours. Syd Barret


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

learning the notes on your fretboard is always a good idea. scales are really quite simple. by knowing the rudiments you will be able to find melodies.
in fact you will be able to create your own.

also, I think it really important to learn early on transitions between chords.
speed isnt what I mean; acuracy is.

lastly, develop your rythm. too many players concentrate on fast licks. that'l get you only so far.
but being a good rythm player will take you much further.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@surfbluewavesbc)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

I know notes already. The thing thats hard for me with rhythm is looking at the fretboard. I always mess barre chords when I am not looking ( any tips for that)


   
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(@kalle_in_sweden)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 779
 

I agree with dogbite that developing the feeling for rythm/timing is very important.
And that is valid both for chord/strumming playing and soloplaying. A simple strumming pattern that holds a constant defined rythm/timing sounds much better than a advanced pattern varying in rythm/timing. Same thing with a solo, a few notes placed at right the timing point sounds much better than millions of notes placed all over.

I have found that playing with backing tracks or with a recordings of a song gives a very good feeling for rythm/timing. I started to play rythm and/or solo over slow songs that I know the chords of. A slow 12 bar (3 chord) blues is good for that purpose.
And the first scale to learn is the minor pentatonic scale.

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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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and I agree with Kalle. .playing with CDs or backing tracks etc.
for getting a sense of rythm I played along with CDs for years...still do.

this will sound silly, but before I got a real guitar I 'air guitared' with albums (pre CDs). my right hand really got a sense of the rythm; perhaps because I didnt have to worry about frets...as my air guitar was fretless LOL.

keep your eyes on the fretboard if looking away messes you up BTW

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@surfbluewavesbc)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

and I agree with Kalle. .playing with CDs or backing tracks etc.
for getting a sense of rythm I played along with CDs for years...still do.

this will sound silly, but before I got a real guitar I 'air guitared' with albums (pre CDs). my right hand really got a sense of the rythm; perhaps because I didnt have to worry about frets...as my air guitar was fretless LOL.

keep your eyes on the fretboard if looking away messes you up BTW

I never really thought about playing with a CD I definely will try that.


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

and I agree with Kalle. .playing with CDs or backing tracks etc.
for getting a sense of rythm I played along with CDs for years...still do.

this will sound silly, but before I got a real guitar I 'air guitared' with albums (pre CDs). my right hand really got a sense of the rythm; perhaps because I didnt have to worry about frets...as my air guitar was fretless LOL.

keep your eyes on the fretboard if looking away messes you up BTW

I never really thought about playing with a CD I definely will try that.

oh man, playing with CDs is so essential. that's how I've learned many songs.
I start with the low E string, playing along to find the chords. then I apply the chords, playing rythm over and over until I get the feel.
then add the voice, then work out the lick...which is made easier by knowing the first chord...which the song is structured on; and the melody is also there because , guess what? , the melody is found in the scale. full circle man.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@surfbluewavesbc)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

I just tried playing the chords to Follow Me by Paul Mcartney with the music ( the first chord song I learned) I was able to play it. Then I tried the chords to Switchfoots Learning to Breath and couldnt figure out to strum up and down or just up or. Question is there any easy way to figure out like whether to strum up and down. I cant figure it out to this song.


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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dont overthink strumming patterns.
play it the way it feels to you.

if you think too much of up or down stroke you will never get the SENSE of the rythm.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@surfbluewavesbc)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

I attempted Learning to Breath again I was able to keep up with song though I think some of the chords were wrong. I only lost track of where I was a few times. I will defienly play with music more often it defienly helped my rythm.

Thanks


   
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(@michhill8)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 420
 

learn scales asap, you should be able to learn at least the the most popular "box-shape" for minor pentatonic, which is a very good scale to learn as it will help with improving, if curious as to box shapes, do a google search or pm me.

Thanks Dudes!
Keep on Rockin'

Pat


   
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