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When will we be good enough?

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(@audioboy)
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This is a question similar to one left my Twisted_Man, but only different.

So, I am a member of a band and all of us are only 4 and five months into guitar and both myself and the other guitarist are just now starting lessons. The question is, how long until you think we will become a decent band, good enough to maybe play in a show? Im sure some time from now but I was wondering what some of the more experienced guitarist would say.

Oh, and can I say that after my first lesson, I feel like Jimi Hnedrix?


   
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 Mike
(@mike)
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It depends on how much you practice together.

You have to get a feel for other people to understand them. When you become one with each other rather than random noise makers is when you guys will know you are getting good.

Have fun getting there!

8)

Mike


   
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 Nils
(@nils)
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So, I am a member of a band and all of us are only 4 and five months into guitar and both myself and the other guitarist are just now starting lessons. The question is, how long until you think we will become a decent band, good enough to maybe play in a show? Im sure some time from now but I was wondering what some of the more experienced guitarist would say. ?
Thats really hard to say since it is not up to one individual it is up to all 4 of you improving at a similar rate and all taking it pretty seriously if you want it to happen quick.
Oh, and can I say that after my first lesson, I feel like Jimi Hnedrix?
Of course you can say that. Now tell us who your teacher is so we can each have one lesson and get that good :lol: :lol:

Now all you have to do is get the other 3 to catch up to you.

Nils' Page - Guitar Information and other Stuff
DMusic Samples


   
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(@wes-inman)
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Audio Boy

My answer may be a little different than the others.

You are probably good enough to play a show right now.

One thing even a beginner has is ears. You know when you sound good. And if it sounds good, it is good.

Really.

Listen to yourselves. It is a great idea to record your practices. Then all of you sit down and listen carefully to what you did.

What is good about it?

What is bad about it?

Did you play too fast? Is the song rushed? Is it too slow? Did the drummer make a mistake at the chorus? Did you sing the song well?

You don't need to hear this from me, you already know this. But listen and discuss what you need to do to make each song better. It doesn't have to be perfect, but it should be entertaining to listen to.

The place where most bands fail is the vocals. Lots of groups can play a cover just like the recording. But very few groups sing well.

Take the time to get each song down. First you need a good rhythm section. The bass and drums must be solid. Start there. Then bring the guitar in. Then practice your singing until it sounds as good as possible. And make sure the vocals are above the mix. Too many bands drown out the singer. Learn to turn down your instruments so the vocals can be heard.

Music does not have to be complicated. People don't care about that at all. But you must play together well as a group. It has to be tight. And the vocals need to be good.

Next practice, work on getting a professional sound. You are good enough now.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@noteboat)
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I'm with Wes.

I once heard an interview with the Edge... the interviewer asked him if U2 started out doing cover tunes. He said no, they were never good enough to do covers, so they started with originals from the beginning.

A couple weeks ago I was working with a lot of U2 tunes for one of my students, and I realized he wasn't kidding. Every single U2 tune I analyzed was very simple - simple guitar, simple bass, simple drums, simple vocals. Even though every part is 'easy', it fits - it's tight, it's professional, it's musical.

They made a strength out of their limitations. You can too.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@ghost-rider)
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I'm with Wes.

I once heard an interview with the Edge... the interviewer asked him if U2 started out doing cover tunes. He said no, they were never good enough to do covers, so they started with originals from the beginning.

A couple weeks ago I was working with a lot of U2 tunes for one of my students, and I realized he wasn't kidding. Every single U2 tune I analyzed was very simple - simple guitar, simple bass, simple drums, simple vocals. Even though every part is 'easy', it fits - it's tight, it's professional, it's musical.

They made a strength out of their limitations. You can too.

I remember hearing the same interview. Seems ironic: they have become such a great band. But on the other hand, they would have had a far better understanding of their own songs than the songs of others. This may be a solution to those beginners who find themselves jumping from song to song; and not learning songs from beginning to end. Write your own...and build a repertoire of your own stuff.

Ghost

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


   
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(@goodvichunting)
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Wes, wonderful insight! Very inspirational. Thanks. :)

Latest addition: Cover of "Don't Panic" by Coldplay
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=502670


   
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 P0RR
(@p0rr)
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must be something about Irish bands ;-)

The Cranberries...initially decided who was going to play what, and then bought the instruments and learnt how to use them. As teenagers they only wrote and played original songs because, as they say in one of the documentaries, they couldn't figure out how to play songs written by others artists. This may have helped to develop the unique style that sets them apart from their contemporaries in the rock/grunge crossover stakes

http://www.michaeldvd.com.au/Reviews/Reviews.asp?ID=3234

Let it rock.....


   
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(@ghost-rider)
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must be something about Irish bands ;-)

The Cranberries...initially decided who was going to play what, and then bought the instruments and learnt how to use them. As teenagers they only wrote and played original songs because, as they say in one of the documentaries, they couldn't figure out how to play songs written by others artists. This may have helped to develop the unique style that sets them apart from their contemporaries in the rock/grunge crossover stakes

http://www.michaeldvd.com.au/Reviews/Reviews.asp?ID=3234

Let it rock.....

Thanks for the info, PORR!

How can one not feel "good enough" performing their own stuff? Had the Cranberries invested their time struggling through doing covers, we may not have the songs which they have offered us. I guess the concern about being "good enough" stems from comparing ourselves to others. When we play our own stuff, there really is no comparison to others. And the inevitable bias, we have in our own stuff, can really propel us to new levels of confidence in ourselves.

Sorta off-topic: "Wanted" was the one song that got me playing guitar. A short effective tune that I loved to listen to over and over again. I remember the moment well, when I thought, "Hey, I wanna do that..." (brings a :D to my face two years later...)

Ghost

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


   
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(@michhill8)
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Gotta love the irish spirit.

Thanks Dudes!
Keep on Rockin'

Pat


   
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(@nicktorres)
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It takes a lifetime, or maybe a little bit more.


   
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(@greybeard)
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Gotta love the irish spirit.
You mean Poteen? :lol: :lol: :lol:

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
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(@wes-inman)
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Wes, wonderful insight! Very inspirational. Thanks.

Recently we played a wedding. I also had to act as DJ and play music at the reception. This was a real mixed crowd, everything from little kids to 80 year old Grandmothers. I was not completely sure what music to play as this was my first wedding.

You wanna know what songs got the best reaction? Grand Funk Railroad. 8)

I played Some Kind of Wonderful and Locomotion. Man, those are both SUPER-SIMPLE songs. Any beginner band could get these songs down quick.

But you have to be tight.

As soon as I put these songs on, dozens of people jumped up and came to the dance floor. They formed a long chain on Locomotion and danced all over the hall going in and out of all the tables. I took note of that. They were having a blast. They could care less that both of these songs are incredibly simple.

People like music with a beat. So get a good groove going and you'll do alright.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@sophisticated-beggar)
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But you have to be tight.

I agree. There is a lot of great advice up there.

Another point to consider is your age. Pretty much, the younger you are the more ability you have to learn things quickly, especially instruments, since conditioning hasn't quite had full effect.

So how old are you guys?


   
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(@ghost-rider)
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But you have to be tight.

I agree. There is a lot of great advice up there.

Another point to consider is your age. Pretty much, the younger you are the more ability you have to learn things quickly, especially instruments, since conditioning hasn't quite had full effect.

So how old are you guys?

I feel old :cry: (which is not surprising, as I am the oldest I have ever been 8) )

I don't really agree with the "young people can learn quicker" argument. Granted, music is a language; and younger people tend to learn languages quicker. And younger people tend to be in better physical shape, generally. But learning anything is all about focus, and practice, and singleminded dedication, which I believe are qualities that are developed by experience. Young people tend to have more time to invest in playing; but then again, having more time doesn't necessarily mean that they use their time wisely and efficiently, both of these understandings are gained by experience.

By "conditioning", do you mean that younger persons are more open than older persons to all types of music and learning?

(I'm 42--but when I hold my guitar, I feel a lot younger :lol:)

Ghost"

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


   
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