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House Of The Rising Sun Tab by Animals

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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1092
 

It's a great song anyway you slice it.

Agree with you there. Just for fun, here's a completely different version - it was a huge hit here in the UK back in about 1970 or so.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t40INnb6DnY

Although, in MY opinion, the Animals' take on HOTRS is the classic/definitive version, I also love this version.

:D :D :D

Vic

Omg, I forgot about Frijid Pink. It's a great version, but I still like the Animals version first and foremost. It sounds more melancholy.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1092
 

Yep, I've been doing Justin's (& Kroikey's) version now. Very easy! My only problem, and maybe this will come with experience and speed, is that when I go from D to F the strings stop ringing. When I go from C to D, I hit the D string then form the rest of the D chord, and it works. I'm pretty OK with Am to C & E. Not so with the F. :|

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

When I go from C to D, I hit the D string then form the rest of the D chord, and it works. I'm pretty OK with Am to C & E. Not so with the F.

Have you tried concentrating on the F note on the D string - the root note - first, then putting the rest of the F chord on? I know you've only got a split second to put the FULL chord on - but you may find this helps. You DON'T need the full, six-string version of F - the top four strings will suffice for this particular song. Ring finger, third fret, D string first - after a while your muscle memory will kick in and your index'll go to the second fret of the G string and your first finger'll form that mini-barre across the E and B strings at the first fret.

As always, patience is the key - slow it down to a speed where you can make the changes comfortably, then gradually speed up till you're playing at the right tempo. I was told this years and years ago, long before I ever joined Guitarnoise - it's one of those pieces of advice that's become almost holy writ around here. But the person who told me this went a bit further - he said, "once you've got to the right tempo, and you can play a song fluently, don't be satisfied with that - try and play it a little faster than the recorded version. You can always slow down to play with other musicians, but it's a hell of a lot harder to speed up."

In other words, if you're playing a song at 90 bpm, once you've achieved some kind of fluency at that speed, try playing it at 100 bpm....or even 120 bpm. You'll be surprised how hard you have to work to get those changes in on time - but you'll be thrilled at the end product.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1092
 

When I go from C to D, I hit the D string then form the rest of the D chord, and it works. I'm pretty OK with Am to C & E. Not so with the F.

Have you tried concentrating on the F note on the D string - the root note - first, then putting the rest of the F chord on? I know you've only got a split second to put the FULL chord on - but you may find this helps. You DON'T need the full, six-string version of F - the top four strings will suffice for this particular song. Ring finger, third fret, D string first - after a while your muscle memory will kick in and your index'll go to the second fret of the G string and your first finger'll form that mini-barre across the E and B strings at the first fret.

No, I didn't think of doing that. Yet that's what I do for the D chord. I hit the D string bass note and while it's ringing quickly make the rest of the D chord. Now why didn't I think of doing that for the F!? But I'm definitely going to do this tonight. I have rarely been using the Big F, and definitely not in this song.
As always, patience is the key - slow it down to a speed where you can make the changes comfortably, then gradually speed up till you're playing at the right tempo. I was told this years and years ago, long before I ever joined Guitarnoise - it's one of those pieces of advice that's become almost holy writ around here.

I don't have a problem with however long it takes to lay down the muscle memory/neural pathways. Even the Little F and Bm are slow for me, but they are getting better, so I know I'll eventually get this to sound smooth.

Good tips, thanks. :)

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@kroikey)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 232
 

I jumped in with big F and Bm on songs straight away. There were too many dead ends and to be honest I knew I'd need to do them and build technique for barres. You'll reap the rewards on it for sure :D


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1092
 

My goal is to use them, so I do practice them. Take the hard road.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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(@kroikey)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 232
 

If you want a good practice song, try Banana Pancakes by Jack Johnson. Its simple, but extremely hard going on the barre chords. The only respite is that the rythmn requires you to do a percussive hit between strumming, and so you have to release and reapply the pressure all the time. Its took me a while to get it down, but it sounds excellent and has improved my barre chords no end.


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(@bluesy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 28
 

Wow, lots of interesting advice! I'll have to read more closesly through the updates when I have a chance. Unfortunately, this is the first time I've been able to check this thread in awhile as my computer blew up late last week and then my laptop also decided to die the other day so I'm have to check on my lunch at work now.

Kroikey, I'll definitely have to give Banana Pancakes the old college try as my barres need work and both the wife and myself love that song so it'll provide some information. Not to deviate the thread too much but if you know of a good tab for this do you mind posting a link or PM'ing it to me? Much appreciated if you can!


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(@davidhodge)
Member Moderator
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

Don't know if you can wait that long, but we'll be having Banana Pancakes as an "Easy Song for Beginners" probably just after the fifteenth of next month (I've got a "book is half-due" deadline on the fifteenth, so I don't think I'll be able to finish the lesson before then...)

Peace


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(@kroikey)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 232
 

I can't really give you the tab as I got mine from an official tab book:
http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Johnson-Between-Dreams-Tab/dp/1575608308

It really has taken some time to get it sounding like the recording, but it was easy enough to simplify it to sing along to at the start. I'll let DHodge enlighten you with a lesson and pitch in with tips since I began attempting it. I'm sure theres Youtube covers and lessons on this too.

Heres a link to me attempting it. http://forums.guitarnoise.com/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=44211&p=407100

We should get back on topic for "House of the Rising Sun"! :)


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(@bluesy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 28
 

Well quickly off topic, I'm very excited for Banana Pancakes David! I can most definitely wait for it though as all the different variations of this song are keeping me busy at the moment. Even further off topic , I am very excited about the book as well!

Kroikey, I understand about the song book. No worries.

Minotaur, thanks for that video link awhile back. That really helped me "get it" with respect to this song. Although I'm finding myself practicing the strumming version more for the time being as I didn't really have the cord changes down quick enough to do the whole bass note, rake, and strike the highest three strings thing. I'm good with David's version, but because I'm only getting a finger or two down immediately it now seems much easier than having to get virtually the whole chord down instantly.


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(@kroikey)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 232
 

To play full speed, its a case of getting the right fingers down first to continue the riff. I'm pretty sure I hardly ever get the whole chord fingered before playing the base note, and I think its quite normal on most songs to be playing notes before you've completed your chord. It feels a bit rushed sometimes, a bit more fluid others, but as long as you can play at the speed you want I think its fine. 8)


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