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(@almann1979)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Topic starter  

When people take a solo, i would bet that overdrive or distortion is used a good 90% of the time. i also assume that there will be some reverb setting on the amp.

im just curious how many people also use a short slapback of delay as a routine when they play lead - im beginning to think this is more common than i used to think, am i missing out?

and if not delay, do some of you routinely use other things like chorus etc.

"I like to play that guitar. I have to stare at it while I'm playing it because I'm not very good at playing it."
Noel Gallagher (who took the words right out of my mouth)


   
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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

I delay quite often. either slapback or one of the three settings on my delay pedal.
a few miliseconds adds to my sustain. reverb is good, but adding a touch of delay adds much to my sound.
I used to avoid the Tap Tempo but have considered it and find when I dial in just right I get a bit of shimmer.
it sounds much different than chorus, which really messes with my tone.

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(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

Since I'm not all that fast a player, I like to use delay as a way to create a bit more energy. Hitting the "tap timer" on the beat or every other beat means that I can play a simple lead line and end up playing harmony with myself (as long as I get the notes right!) Going with the tap timer on the half beat can create a bit of a "waterfall" effect that I like.

Thing is that this sort of thing can get old pretty fast, so I try to use it sparingly.

Slapback is a staple for a rockabilly sound, so it's good to keep in your pocket as well.

Peace


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 10264
 

Delay's not an amp setting I use very often....reverb, yes. What I DO tend to use is when I'm recording a guitar track, I'll copy and paste the original track (in Audacity) so's I've got two tracks exactly the same.....then I'll use a tiny bit of delay to get more echo. I also use delay on the vocal tracks, again just a tiny bit of separation between two identical tracks - makes my voice sound fuller, and believe me, the voice needs all the help it can get!!!!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@gnease)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5038
 

I often use slapback to add a little dimensional character to the sound. when I do, I usually go sans reverb.

-=tension & release=-


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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Oh yes, and I'm 100% behind Dogbite re chorus - I only use it when I'm on the "acoustic" setting, otherwise it REALLY screws up the tone!!!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@trguitar)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

I like a little delay and some reverb for my sound. I'm in the chorus for clean pretty sounding things camp as well.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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(@greybeard)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

A lot of people use what is called "hall" here, in Germany - it's echo, which gives the impression of being in a room.

When you play in a room, there are always echoes off the walls and ceiling, not strong enough to sound like slap, but definitely not totally dry, either. That's the minimum to use. It gives ambience without really being noticed.

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(@slejhamer)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3221
 

Dotted-eighth delay is my "always on" effect. Tap tempo makes it really easy to set. Line 6 "Echo Park" is the pedal I use to get a U2 / Edge sound, which I've begun using in church now that I'm playing electric guitar one weekend a month.

Chorus seemed more popular in the 1980s and maybe early 90s. You can hear it on many recordings. A little goes a long way ...

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


   
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(@gnease)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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I'll endorse the Echo Park, as well as Line6's seminal-and-still-great DL4 delay modeler. Line6 does delay well … if nothing else. Slej brings up a good point: 'tap tempo' no longer means simply 'repeat at the tap rate', but is now much more sophisticated and useful, as tapping to the beat will get one sync'ed and optimized sub-beat and non-integer echos such slapback and dotted-eighth (in many of the newer delay pedals). probably have Linn to thank for that innovation. very powerful.

if I think a part may need chorus, it usually means a 12-string (sans chorus) will really be the sound I want.

-=tension & release=-


   
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(@slejhamer)
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Slej brings up a good point: 'tap tempo' no longer means simply 'repeat at the tap rate', but is now much more sophisticated and useful, as tapping to the beat will get one sync'ed and optimized sub-beat and non-integer echos such slapback and dotted-eighth

You know, I've gotten so spoiled by the Echo Park's ease-of-use that I forgot that most of the lower-priced delay pedals (and some of the higher priced ones) with tap tempo do not do the off-beat sync. I had a Digidelay, which had a respectable tone when engaged (though a poor bypass tone), and I found it very difficult to set a dotted-eighth delay with that pedal's tap feature. On the Echo Park, you simply tap to the beat of the song and it automatically adjusts to the off beat notes. Very cool.

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


   
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(@almann1979)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Topic starter  

sounds interesting, i never have really used my tap tempo. is it something you can quickly use live, or is it for home use only?

"I like to play that guitar. I have to stare at it while I'm playing it because I'm not very good at playing it."
Noel Gallagher (who took the words right out of my mouth)


   
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(@gnease)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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IMO: live is were it's the most useful! tap your foot to the song, and it's set.

-=tension & release=-


   
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(@trguitar)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

Never had a delay with a tap tempo control. My new modeling practice amp has one and I was curious about how to use it best. My delay pedal has a delay time control as well as feedback and level. The tap would be like the delay time wouldn't it? How frequently it repeats.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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(@guitarhack)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 196
 

I don't mean to hijack the post, but since the Line 6 Echo Park and DL-4 were brought up, which one would you guys recommend? I've been in the market for a delay for some time now and have heard nothing but great things about Line 6 delays, but I'm not sure if I should save some money by going with the Echo Park, or spend a little extra on the DL-4 and get the bells a whistles.

Dan


   
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