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1st and 2nd inversions

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(@artlutherie)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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In the new Acoustic Guitar there's a lesson on using inversions for 12 bar blues, the example they have is in the key of A. Anybody know of any online resources concerning inversions?

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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Inversions are pretty simple - whatever the bottom note is names the inversion.

If the bottom note is the root, it's in root position.

If the bottom note is the third, it's first inversion - C/E would be a first inversion.

If the bottom note is the fifth, it's second inversion - C/G would be one of those.

If the chord is extended, you can get even more... C7/Bb would be a third inversion, since the seventh is on the bottom.

More practical for guitar is voicings, because the root note isn't usually prominent in guitar chords. For example, an E chord could be played in first inversion in any of these ways (plus lots of others):

422xxx
xxx100
xx6454
4xx10x

Each one has a very different sound, but all are the same inversion. You might want to just consult a chord dictionary, and just figure out the inversions yourself... IMO, knowing inversions isn't as valuable to a guitarist as knowing voice leading (which focuses on the top note)

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(@artlutherie)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 1157
Topic starter  

Thanks tom! I'll look into that more seriously.

Chuck Norris invented Kentucky Fried Chicken's famous secret recipe, with eleven herbs and spices. But nobody ever mentions the twelfth ingredient: Fear!
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