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Alternate tunings.

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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

Does anyone know of any book that contains "fingering patterns" written out for alternate tunings? I would write them out myself, but I'm lazy. I want it to contain Major/Modes, Pentatonic scales, harmonic minors, Melodic minors and everything else that is useful. I already know the chromatic scale for every tuning possible so that don't necessay have to be in there. :lol: It must also contain Db-Ab-Db-Gb-Bb-Db because thats what I'm working on at this moment. 100's of other tunings would also be useful. Thanks! :wink:


   
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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

David's posted a few lessons dealing with alternate tunings. They might be helpful:

On the tuning awry,open tuning part i, and open tuning part ii.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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(@hughm)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 39
 

Work them out yourself. Write them down. They'll stick in your head that way.


   
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(@yoyo286)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 1681
 

Work them out yourself. Write them down. They'll stick in your head that way.

Remember, he's lazy.. :lol:

Stairway to Freebird!


   
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(@hughm)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 39
 

No doubt.

But, ya know, it brings up the whole issue of the proliferation of learning resources - particularly on the internet, but in print media as well.

In my day (back when the mountains were cooling), there was just not a lot of learning material out there. The people who wrote music books wrote lousy, dry ones that were filled with accurate information, but that were really, really unappealing. There were the usual songbooks for guitar, but nothing much beyond that. That was bad. But, in the end, it was a good thing that young guys like me had to actually put a pencil to paper and work things out every now and then. I actually thought it was extremely cool that those little dots and lines stored musical ideas. But, then again, I was also a real dork.

It is a great thing that there are a good number of musician/teacher/writers hybrids around these days - Mr. Hodge being a fine example of that - but I can't help but think that this generally happy situation has created an unrealistic expectation: that you can just run out and buy your "magic bullet" music book, or load your nifty jam-o-rama software, and with no sweat at all become a proficient and educated musician. The illusion of . . . what? . . . effortless, osmotic learning is just so pervasive.

(Notwithstanding what I have said, I don't mean to lump Noteboat into some camp of shifty dream merchants; I understand he's written a pretty decent book.)


   
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