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Box Patterns, vs. Scales vs. Keys

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oblio
(@oblio)
Active Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 9
Topic starter  

Hey all, I'm pretty much new here.

This is something I have an understanding of but still feel there is something lacking.

Now, please tell me if this is right...

I believe Keys are used for chord selection in song writing, and scales tend to be more riff and solo oriented. And box patterns are just the patterns that scales follow over the fretboard...

But now does that mean a solo shouldnt contain notes that our out of the key your chords are in? How do the three relate to each other like that?


   
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Musenfreund
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

The key is another way of saying which scale the song is written in. At least that's the short and simple answer since there are undoubtedly layers of complexity I'm missing....

The key or scale tells you both what the chord progression will be and which notes are available for soloing and riffs. All the notes that fit into the chords for that particular progression are also derived from the scale and key.

And, yes, the boxes are simply patterns for your fingers to learn so that you can move from one end of the fretboard to the other while staying in the scale or key.

And songs do sometimes pull notes or even chords from outside the scale and key. But typically they don't. That's more or less true anyway.

I hope that's somewhat helpful!

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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oblio
(@oblio)
Active Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 9
Topic starter  

so your saying the notes to a particular key and scale are the same?

And then perhaps the key is the notes available and the scale is the progression? Which introduces modes... yes?


   
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reasonableman
(@reasonableman)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 71
 

so your saying the notes to a particular key and scale are the same?

And then perhaps the key is the notes available and the scale is the progression? Which introduces modes... yes? The key does dictate the notes "available" (I use inverted commas as obviously all notes are possible) and these notes are in the scale. The chords in the progression are then derived from the notes available.

A progression is just a series of chords. A particular progression is indentifiable by the scale.

Really I think the best way to understand is this:

Learn the basics of reading music and triad (chord) constuction.
Write out the scale on a staff.

Construct the triads on each degree of the scale and then work out what chords you've made.

It really makes it obvious what your doing and shows some of the benefits of reading music.

I hope you can understand that.


   
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Musenfreund
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

Don't worry about modes yet.

Yes, the scale/key tells you which notes are typically available for building chords/solos/riffs. Because the scale tells you which notes are available for building chords, it also gives you the chord progression.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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