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Interesting chord "Learn guitar the easy way&

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(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
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hey guys,

Maybe i'm being stupid, bit I was just looking at teh chords on the "Learn guitar the easy way" advert...

It starts with a G, then a D, then this

1e: --3—(f#)--pinky  
2B: --0—(b)--
3G: --1—(Ab)--index
4D: --0—(d)--
5A: --3—(b)--ring  
6E: --x—(x)--

i know its some kind of B, any suggestions, i've never come accross this chord before? :)

Chalmodo


   
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(@alangreen)
Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5342
 

The 3rd fret of that top string is G - so if you're fingering there it would be G(add b9)

If you're playing F#, then the B, D, F# Ab is a Bm(Aug6)

If you went down one more fret, B, D, F, Ab would be Bdim7

OR - it could just be someone putting their fingers on a guitar neck for the benefit of the advert.

Best,

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
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(@greybeard)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Unfortunately, there has been an error - the A string is fretted at the 3rd fret - which is "C" not "B", so, as I see it, you could call it CMaj7sus2add6 or Gadd2add4(C), neither of which is really common  ::)

And the other options are even more outlandish.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
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(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
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revised chord

1e: --2—(f#)--pinky  
2B: --0—(b)--  
3G: --1—(Ab)--index
4D: --0—(d)--  
5A: --2—(b)--ring  
6E: --x—(x)--

sorry, i miss interpretted it from the diagram.


   
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(@musicdisciple)
Active Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 6
 

If you take the Ab as a G# and make that the root the you have G#, B, D and F# so it's a first inversion of a G# half diminished 7. I assume it goes to an A quite soon after that?


   
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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 608
 

G#ø/b ?????

or much simpler (and with the context of a B chord)

its B6!!!!


   
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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

It all depends on which one's the root....

B-D-F#-G# (1-b3-5-6)
D-F#-G#-B (1-3-#4-6)
F#-B-D-G# (1-4-b6-9)
G#-B-D-F# - enharmonic to Ab-Cb-Ebb-Gb (1-b3-b5-b7)

So it's likely either Bm6 or Abm7b5

But here's a little twist... what if the 6th string isn't muted?  Then it's E-G#-B-D-F#, for a nice and tidy E9 chord!  (The same is true if the guitar doesn't play E, but the bass or piano picks it up)

Tom

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@musicdisciple)
Active Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 6
 

What chords come after it?


   
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(@Anonymous)
New Member
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if you look to the right of the "Guitar Noise" logo, and the guy playing guitar, you'll see an advert pannel.

Hit refresh enough time on your browser, and i'm sure you'll see the advert come up for "Learning Guitar the easy way" (of which there is none IMHO)

The chord is in there.

The progression they have listed is

G, D then ??

Now, I agree with Alex and Noteboat, some kind of A or B, or even E could easily fit there (ish)

Its just that i was concerned with all the years i've been playing, i've never come accross that chord before, and if you've ever played any RHCP you'll see some crazy ass chords.

But this is an ad for learning guitar the easy way isnt it?

Chalmodo


   
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(@musicdisciple)
Active Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 6
 

So it's not being used in the context of a song? Then you can't really determine what chord it is. There are a few things you can call it. It's the function of it that would determine what it really is and for that the chord that comes after it is more important than what comes before.

Are you sure you've written it out properly? If you're just learning beginner chords then x21202 is often used as a B7 and I'm wondering if you've just typo'd that.


   
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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 608
 

sorry, meant Bm6!

erm musicdisciple

i agree with your post, and i dont. you cant say you cannot determine any chord by itself it has to have surrounding chords... i agree its name can change depending on the key but you can isolate a chord and name it, he wanted to know what type of "B" chord it was.

i really do understand your point and i know it is true in some circumstances, but somehow the way that it comes accross i dont think is a way for beginners to learn how to name chords, that it has to be in a context.

oh well whatever, ill shut up now :)


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

It's somewhat true that you can name a chord in isolation -- you can certainly hang a moniker on it, and work with that.  In the case of triads, you can even be certain that you've got the name right....

Once you get beyond triads, though, it's tought going to look at a chord alone.  Minor 7ths can be Major 6ths, m7b5s can be half diminished, etc.  While the name can be functional as far as learning a chord, learning the harmonic structure depends on seeing the whole piece, and the names end up changing fairly frequently.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@nicktorres)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 5381
 

F#sus2sus4+5/B

G#m7b5/B

Are also both valid names for that chord.  That's why you need context.

Good not to be too confusing though.


   
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