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Intervals


(@guitarteacher)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 46
Topic starter  

I learned to identify intervals in high school. They taught it by memorizing the interval between the first two notes of a particular song. Once I learned intervals by ear, I forgot all of the songs associated with the different intervals. The only song I can remember is "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" which would represent the octave. Has anyone heard of this system and, if so, would you mind posting the intervals and their respective songs? I think it would be helpful to those studying beginning theory.

Thanks,

GT

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1120
 

I am sorry, but I don't have an answer to your question - just an "add on" question! :D

What is the best method for training your ear to learn intervals?


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(@guitarteacher)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 46
Topic starter  

Julie Andrews.

Anyone?

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


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(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

Julie Andrews.

in "The Sound of Music," more specifically.

How 'bout these?

* 0: Unison: Happy Birthday To You (the two notes of "happy")

* 1: Minor second: Theme from Jaws

* 2: Major second: Frere Jacques, Happy Birthday

* 3: Minor third: Brahms' Lullaby, the Olympic Fanfare and Theme (heard as the first brass notes in the fanfare) which plays at the beginning of NBC Olympic broadcasts, Somewhere Out There, Greensleeves

* 4: Major third: Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, Summon the Heroes (the 1996 Olympic theme, heard on NBC during Olympic broadcasts), Kumbaya, Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da

* 5: Perfect fourth: Auld Lang Syne ("Should Auld..."), the wedding song ("Here comes the bride"), or O Christmas Tree

* 6: Tritone: "Maria" and "Cool", from West Side Story,the theme from The Simpsons, or from Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath.

* 7: Perfect fifth: Also sprach Zarathustra (Strauss) (Theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey), Hey There, Georgie Girl, the theme from Chariots of Fire (before the main melody) or Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star (between the first and second twinkles)

* 8: Minor sixth: Scott Joplin's The Entertainer (Main theme after the intro), Across the Stars from Star Wars, or the theme from Love Story

* 9: Major sixth: My Bonnie Lies Over The Ocean, or the NBC theme

* 10: Minor seventh: Somewhere, from West Side Story

* 11: Major seventh: a-Ha's Take On Me, or the first and third notes of Somewhere Over the Rainbow

* 12: Octave: Somewhere Over the Rainbow

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1120
 

Slej:

Thanks for the examples, they are good. But, is there somewhere, on the internet (preferably free :D ) that I can practice listening to various intervals, so that I can try to guess what they are? There has to be a "game" out there somewhere on the net that plays an interval and you guess which one it is - Help!


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(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 974
 

Slej:

Thanks for the examples, they are good. But, is there somewhere, on the internet (preferably free :D ) that I can practice listening to various intervals, so that I can try to guess what they are? There has to be a "game" out there somewhere on the net that plays an interval and you guess which one it is - Help!

There sure is:
http://www.musictheory.net/trainers/html/id90_en.html

Arjen deserves the credit for this one - He posted it a couple of months ago and it's the best I've seen.


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(@slejhamer)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

http://www.musictheory.net/trainers/html/id90_en.html
Arjen deserves the credit for this one - He posted it a couple of months ago and it's the best I've seen.
+1

That site has a few great learning tools.

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1120
 

Thanks for the site - I tried it and got most wrong!

Maybe I need a keyboard with me, to work the examples out?


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(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 974
 

Thanks for the site - I tried it and got most wrong!

Maybe I need a keyboard with me, to work the examples out?

No - you just need to start at the simplest level. You can cut out the difficult intervals and bring them in gradually.
You could start with just the perfect intervals. Make sure you can tell a fourth from a fifth - then bring in the thirds. Also - make a note of the ones that you get wrong most often - and then target those until you can get them right. You'll probably find that the most difficult intervals are the 6ths and 7ths.

As your score starts to rise, then increase the range gradually to include all intervals and even chords. But back it up with real music listening practice too. Not just dry intervals - you need practice within a real musical context too.
If you do it logically and conscientiously, you can't help but improve significantly - guaranteed.


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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1120
 

Okay, I didn't realize you can eliminate the tougher ones! Thanks for the tip!

I also just noticed that there is a keyboard there too! Great site - thanks for the help.


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(@number6)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 152
 

I would also recommend http://www.good-ear.com

The hunger site. Click once a day to give free food.


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(@aarrgg)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 32
 

Try EarMaster Pro 5.
It automaticly increase the difficulty as you get better but is only free for a month.
You can also train other music skills such as chord identification, scale identification, rythm dictation, etc.

"I face myself, to cross out what I've become
erase myself, and let go of what I've done"
- Linkin Park


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(@guitar4k)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 24
 

Awesome sites guys! After visiting I realized my ears aren't as sharp as I thought. Need more practice!


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(@jminor)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 168
 

Another great tool is Functional Ear Trainer (PC's only, no Mac's)

This plays a root note, chord, or cadence and then plays a related tone and you have to select what degree of the scale is being played... It can be based on any specific key or the key can change randomly.
It's probably the best free tool i have seen/heard for ear training.

You can make it as easy or difficult as you like.

Peace

J

Insert random quote here


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 rip
(@rip)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 42
 

I realize I am digging this topic out of the vault... But, I thought I would add to the original post. I love this chart for songs that you can associate with intervals:

http://www.jazzwise.com/catalog/media/AeberHbk/22.pdf

Enjoy,
Rip

Author of "Survivor" - http://www.vaughnripley.com


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