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Music and the mind...

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DayZd
(@dayzd)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

How does music effect you? What is it in your head that music takes hold of? I find...when I listen to something heavy and vicious...I go kinda psycho...I grab my skateboard and go out fearless. Then I slam hard...so I listen to some more and the pain goes away and I'm up skating again...same for snowboarding. I see a ramp and I just think "the higher the better" and I go (Controlling my speed of course) and fly off it...then I crash...but I go back up and try it again no matter how hard I fell (Unless I broke something). Its like a harmless and legal drug that you can make yourself...

Anything that is too stupid to be spoken is sung

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<--=-.._DayZd_..-=-->


   
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NoteBoat
(@noteboat)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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Pretty deep question...

I've heard melodies as long as I can remember. Making them come out makes me happy in a way nothing else does; it's like there's a part of my heart that gets warmed up when I express in musical sounds, an itch that nothing else will scratch. I find myself unable to NOT make music.

In listening, it depends on what it is, and on my state of mind at the time. At times I'll hear something... whether it's a cello concerto or a blues guitar solo.. and I get lost in it. It astonishes me how a good composer, or a good interpreter, can reach across time and touch you.

Yes, music can pump me up or calm me down, but I think that's a shallower level of music somehow (or a shallower reaction in me) because there are other experiences that can do either. Most of the time, music has an affect on me that I can't express, other than by making music myself.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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Wes Inman
(@wes-inman)
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If music is played properly, it will make you feel exactly as intended. It can make you cry, or laugh. It can make you happy or sad. It can make you carefree or deeply reflective. It can make you feel like the biggest loser or the champion of the world.

And I think this is what we should all strive for when playing music. Play it with feeling. And if we do it well the listener will feel the same way.

This was a great question. We always talk about scales, and theory, and technique, etc... But what is truly important is to communicate your message and feelings through music.

And oh yeah, music has been shown to actually work as a pain-killer. Believe it or not, in my younger days I was quite a skateboarder and surfer as well. I know exactly what you are talking about.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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sirN
 sirN
(@sirn)
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I love to hear the sound of a guitar crying. That sound that comes from a slow bend or maybe a slow slide (ala free bird). Usually moving upward as opposed to down as if done with a wammybar.

I also love the sound of vocals when not actually singing words, but rather a feeling (moaning?). Hard to describe, but that's what usually pulls me in.

check out my website for good recording/playing info


   
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Yellow_Tangerine
(@yellow_tangerine)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Music, when it is really good and played with emotion, no matter what the subject matter, makes me cry. Bluegrass, opera, rock, and especially Ray Charles. It makes me want to get up and grab my guitar and write something with just as much emotion and feeling. Not many things make me cry like Phantom of the Opera!

Pretty embarrassing when listening with friends, though :roll: don't want them to think I'm a wimp. But music is a very personal thing for me, so all's good when I'm alone and can express myself without worrying what others think.

And yes, slide guitar is one of the most expressive forms of music, other than voice. Just love it!

If you don't know where you're going,
Any road will take you there


   
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DemoEtc
(@demoetc)
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When I heard a bit of Survivor From Warsaw a few years back it totally took me by the throat. And since it wasn't in English it wasn't the meaning of the words that got to me.

Gave me chills.

Roy Buchanan always does that too.


   
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BAN310
(@ban310)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 15
 

I'm taking General Psych this semester, and this was actually brought up. Music requires both hemispheres of the brain, being both linear and spatial. Thats why it helps babies minds develop, it cements those neural connections early. Doesn't have to be classical either, but Mozart was a good example because he uses a wide range of octaves, etc.

I think we enjoy music so much because we can put so much of ourselves into it. It leads to that state of "being in the zone" as athletes put it. Whether we're playing or listening.


   
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BAN310
(@ban310)
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Music, when it is really good and played with emotion, no matter what the subject matter, makes me cry. Bluegrass, opera, rock, and especially Ray Charles. It makes me want to get up and grab my guitar and write something with just as much emotion and feeling. Not many things make me cry like Phantom of the Opera!

Pretty embarrassing when listening with friends, though :roll: don't want them to think I'm a wimp. But music is a very personal thing for me, so all's good when I'm alone and can express myself without worrying what others think.

And yes, slide guitar is one of the most expressive forms of music, other than voice. Just love it!

I get that way too. Especially when listening to violin or bagpipes. I think both of those are extremely emotional instruments.

It isn't really sadness either, its an awe and appreciation that someone could create and play something so beautiful.


   
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sevenroy
(@sevenroy)
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I have to agree with bluegrass giving me chills, as do some country songs and classical music. The old trucker song "Teddy Bear" brings a tear to my eye every time.


   
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gizzy
(@gizzy)
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Music for me has helped me with many feelings inside, breaking up with my ex wife, I buried myself in music even more and it helped me see that other people can feel the same way you do so they write a song to express it, It becomes a friend that you can turn to to help cope when sad and when feeling good, there are songs to express all emotions I have listened to music since I was 4 years old my radio is on all day at work and when in my car and when I get home my guitar comes out along with the stereo. I would be lost without it.

:D


   
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Shine Eyed
(@shine-eyed)
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Wow... very interesting seeing stuff like this on a music board.

I'm new here, but the observation I've made is that musicians (or people INTO music) tend to be more emotional people. My eyes well up in certain circumstances that may not really impact other people. Music does it to me. Seeing the generosity that some people are capable of does it to me. The patriotism I hold for my country does it to me. For crying out loud, I'm more emotional than my wife for 3 weeks out of each month ;).


   
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Bill_Gates_jr.
(@bill_gates_jr)
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Howdie all

music to me can be enjoyed in the background as a secondary pleasure during conversation or just passing time BUT

When in search of those nerve curdling sensations I have leaned toward acoustical music with vocal harmonies that accent the flavour of the musical piece

When you add the vocal harmonies to the acoustic instruments be it guitar ,piano etc. Both SHERES of the brain are pleasured !!

NOW IF i COULD ONLY FIND THE TALENT WITHIN (thats work in progress) to match the emotions in side I could stimulate both spheres all on my own

cheers


   
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DayZd
(@dayzd)
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Topic starter  

It leads to that state of "being in the zone" as athletes put it. Whether we're playing or listening.

The zone. Sometimes when I'm playing one of my own riffs or something and I've played it enough to be able to do without looking at the guitar at all I tend to close my eyes and I kinda go into a trance and I never make a single mistake, I open them again and its like I just woke up from a dream and here I am just standing their playing something on a guitar. As soon as the reality kicks in I realise I need to put in more effort and I make minor mistakes. Also...at school...even when I'm writing a hard maths test, I tend to move my foot to a beat without even realising, even though I'm concentrating on my test and ahvn't got a song stuck in my head or something.

Anything that is too stupid to be spoken is sung

-----------------------

<--=-.._DayZd_..-=-->


   
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BAN310
(@ban310)
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For crying out loud, I'm more emotional than my wife for 3 weeks out of each month ;).

LOL


   
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PsYcHoNIK
(@psychonik)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 268
 

i find that music generates a certain emotion in me as well. When i go to local shows, there are some really good heavy bands that play... and i find myself taking the mosh pits up a notch... and when im sitting at home listening to satriani, im just "chillin" really feeling the (generally) happy vibe. I work out to slayer and sleep to beethoven. i even cried at G3's concert in 2002 when steve vai played an extended version of "for the love of god".
Ive got alot of quotes about music and its greatness.. i just wish i could remember some of them.


   
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