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Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Serb

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(@adrianjmartin)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 76
Topic starter  

Tom,
Will your book get published in the UK - Amazon only have it available via there international resellers - and that's adding a considerable price for shipping.
( the only UK reseller is listing it a £100.38 ! )

Adrian


   
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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 10264
 

Adrian, check out the "sticky" at the top of this forum - Get Noteboat's Theory Book Here - all the info you need is in there.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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(@morpheus)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 68
 

Jeanguitar,

If you're here to promote another website, there is a better place to post. Check out this link.
https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=32

Best of luck
J


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Jean,

First off, I'm Tom - I wrote the theory book in question.

Second, I agree that you can't learn to play by reading a book - and my book isn't meant to teach anyone how to play.

Third, I've looked at your site; it's really weak on theory. In fact, you've got only two theory posts... and one of them is historically inaccurate:

As music crawled out of the middle ages into the Renaissance it had become common to use scales with just 7 notes in them. Due to common usage it seemed simpler to just identify these 7 main notes with names.

You imply that 7-note scales are rooted in Renaissance music or that of the middle ages. They aren't; evidence of diatonic 7 note scales is as old as written music, existing in cuniform tablets dated to 1250 BCE.

You imply that naming notes with letters dates to the Renaissance; in fact, at least four different systems of naming notes with letters existed as early as 1000 BCE.

In fact, chromatically altered notes were widely used in the music of the middle ages. Flats were used as early as 1100, naturals by about 1500. The thing the Renaissance contributed was the printing press - which fostered standardized notation of accidentals.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@guitarhack)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 196
 

Tom, do you ever NOT know the answer to a music theory question? I got your book as a Christmas gift (it was the one thing on my list) and love the fact you really do start with the very basics. Thanks.

Dan


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

All the time, Dan. That's why I keep on studying :)

Right now I'm chewing my way through all the books I got as Christmas gifts - I'm nearly halfway through an academic text on the history and development of standard notation, and possible solutions to solving problems that arise in avant garde compositions. Right now I'm reading the chapter on measures and bar lines... I had no idea it would require 40 pages (!!!) to look at all the aspects of something I'd thought was pretty simple.

I just love learning more about this stuff!

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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