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name that chord


(@maxrumble)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Hi,

I am writing out the chords to Rockstar and I finally found all of what I believe are correct Chords but I would like to be able to name the chords correctly.

If I form a e shaped minor barre form and remove my middle finger from the b string what do I have?

Cheers,

Max


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Let's say you weren't in a barre. You'd have E-A-E-G-B-E.

If E is the root, that's E-G-B-A, or Em (add 11)
If G is the root, G-B-E-A. That's Gm6/9.
The other two (B, A) aren't likely roots, because neither one would have a third - and the B wouldn't have a fifth either.

But chords can't be named in isolation. You need context to get the name right.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@maxrumble)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

Thats interesting. I know just enough theory to get myself into trouble.

I was playing the song as if the root were the A string. I subconsciously assumed by the chord shape that the root was the A. I just learned the song. I will go play along to the recording while I try the chords with the other roots.

Thanks.

Cheers,

Max


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(@maxrumble)
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Topic starter  

I like the sound of either root - weird, but I prefer fuller chords on the E.

Cheers,

Max


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(@fretsource)
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Something's not right here. You're talking about removing your 3rd finger from the B string on an E minor barre chord shape. But with that shape, you won't be be playing anything on the B string (2nd string) apart from the barre with your 1st finger. Do you mean removing your 3rd finger from the A (5th) string, but you're calling it B as that's the note played on it when the chord is actually E minor? If so, then NoteBoat is spot on.

I also wondered if you actually meant an A minor barre chord shape, but even then, the finger on the B string would be 2, not 3 (unless you were counting your thumb as finger 1).


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(@maxrumble)
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Topic starter  

I think its best to give you an example. If I form a Bm at the second fret and remove my middle finger from the b string (d note) the represents the chord shape. I am not actually playing this chord.

I am playing this shape in three places on the neck with a barre at the first, third and sixth frets. The chords in the verse are
G, C, F, C, G, in that order. I understand most songs have the first chord as the key but I believe that the key here is C. The last chord of the song would be the above chord shape with a barre at the sixth fret.

What do you think?

Cheers,

Max


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(@noteboat)
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I think that's not the E shape minor! (I assumed you'd made a mistake on calling it the B string - I figured you'd mixed up 2nd/5th)

What you've got is the A minor shape. And the notes (if it were Am) would be A-E-A-B-E. Here you don't have notes arranged in thirds, so there's no certain name. But there will be a "right" name based on the notes in the context of other chords - for instance, if you play Am, and then lift the finger, I'd go with Am(add9) - the listener will associate it with the minor sound you'd just played, even though the chord itself isn't minor.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@fretsource)
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Sorry - I added to the confusion by thinking you said you removed your 3rd finger, but actually you said middle finger, which is correct.
So, as I suspected, you're playing the A minor shape chord, not E minor shape and you're removing the middle finger. In the case of the example you gave, modified B minor, removing that finger would produce the notes X B F# B C# F#. If B is the root then the chord is commonly called B sus 2, a name that causes great debate around these parts. Some prefer to call it B add 9 (no 3rd) or B min add 9 if the missing 3rd is implied by the context.


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(@maxrumble)
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I thought barre chords were called E shaped due to the open E fingering shape regardless of position. I guess Ill add another barre chord shape to my vocabulary.

Thanks.

Cheers,

Max


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(@fretsource)
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I thought barre chords were called E shaped due to the open E fingering shape regardless of position. I guess Ill add another barre chord shape to my vocabulary.

Thanks.

Nope - the only barre chords that are called E shape are those that produce any kind of E chord when you slide it down to the nut as far as it will go. The shape you're talking about is an A shape (in this case A minor shape) because that's the chord you get when you slide it down to the nut. The same thing applies to all barre chord shapes. Slide any barre chord down as far as it will go, name the chord there and that gives you the name of the shape, e.g., C shape, G shape, etc


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(@maxrumble)
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Topic starter  

Cool

I knew about that all of the CAGED chords could be played in any position. I just didn't realize about the Am shape.

Excellent

Thanks Fretsource and Noteboat.

Cheers,

Max


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