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Question about the modes

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qiuniu
(@qiuniu)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

I don't know much about theory, but I do play for a couple of hours everyday for 20 years, what I have figured out is this:

A Mixolydian D Ionian G Lydian E Dorian B Aeolian F# Phrygian C# Locrian
B Mixolydian E Ionian A Lydian F# Dorian C# Aeolian G# Phrygian D# Locrian

and so on,

So I figured this out and I've memorized my scales, so I have two questions

One, is if I want to write a song in Am how do I figure out the other chords in the progression? (you know I,IV,V)

and if I want to play a minor scale over it, what is the difference between the minor scales? (I know the differences between the Major ones...)

thanx in advance for any help!

q


   
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Fretsource
(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 973
 

To figure out the chords that fit most naturally in a minor key, you take the minor scale and build chords on each scale note using alternate note of the scale, e.g., the 1st, 3rd & 5th notes for chord i, the 2nd, 4th & 6th notes for chord ii, etc.
There are three slightly different forms of the minor scale called the natural, harmonic and melodic minor scales, which produce slightly different chords, all of which can be used when writing in a minor key.

A natural minor = ABCDEFGA
i = A C E = A minor
ii = B D F = B diminished
III = C E G = C major
iv = D F A = D minor
v = E G B = E minor
VI = F A C = F major
VII = G B D = G major

A harmonic minor = A B C D E F G# A and A melodic minor = A B C D E F# G# A and either of these can produce another important and frequently used V (or V7) chord: E major (EG#B) or E7 (E G# B D)

But... I can't see what your questions have to do with modes.


   
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qiuniu
(@qiuniu)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

But... I can't see what your questions have to do with modes.

Thanks for the quick reply!

Well, the way I look at things I think I'm writing a song in Am then I think I want to play A Dorian over it. Or if the song is in E I play E Ioian over it, which is also B Mixolydian, etc...

Do you know the differences between the minor modes are (I know the major ones!)

thanx in advance!

q


   
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hbriem
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 646
 

At this stage I would strongly recommend forgetting about modes and concentrating on the major keys as well as the natural, harmonic and melodic minors.

Modes will do nothing but confuse you and introduce side-tracks that are mostly irrelevant to learning to play modern music.

This especially applies to the so-called modes of the minor scales (harmonic and melodic). They have no use except for theory-spinning.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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qiuniu
(@qiuniu)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

At this stage I would strongly recommend forgetting about modes and concentrating on the major keys as well as the natural, harmonic and melodic minors.

Modes will do nothing but confuse you and introduce side-tracks that are mostly irrelevant to learning to play modern music.

This especially applies to the so-called modes of the minor scales (harmonic and melodic). They have no use except for theory-spinning.

Thanks for the advice!

I study Jerry Garcia though, he uses Mixolydian ALOT, so for me they will always be there for me.

I will look into it though...


   
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