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(@rage_nirvana_nin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

Ok so want to start learning theory and i've got the idea of each 3 letters of a scale equal one chord and such and the chord "formula" but ok take the c major scale for instance

c,d,e,f,g,a,b,c

how would this be played on the guitar??

We have to ask ourselves. What would Ultralord do?


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

There are a number of different ways to play it. You could play it all on one string, for example, but that might get to be a bit clumsy while trying to play a song. So typically you can organize the scales into "boxes" up and down the fretboard.

Take a look at Greybeard's diagram of the G major scale:

Greybeard in G

You might also want to check other topics on his site:

Greybeard's theory resources

That should get you started!

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@rage_nirvana_nin)
Eminent Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

thanks.

We have to ask ourselves. What would Ultralord do?


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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 611
 

E:-1-2-----
B:---2--4--
G:-1--3-4--
D:-1--3-4--
A:-1-2--4--
E:---2---4-

thats the "major scale" pattern..

start on any note on the low E string and play that and you will have a major scale from that starting note..

the numbers represent the fingers to use when playing

so put your 2nd finger on the 8th fret of the E string, work by that and you will have C major.


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(@noteboat)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

Learning boxes, like the one Alex illustrated (which is the only 'closed' major fingering that doesn't require a shift or stretch) is a start, and the CAGED system, which adds other box patterns, goes further to make scales throughout the fretboard... it's a good start, and the one almost all of us used.

To really learn the scales and chords, though, you'll eventually get back to the approach you're working at on your own: you learn the spellings of each scale, learn the formulas for each chord, and you learn the fretboard completely.

The limiting factor in systems like CAGED is that you can find yourself in between positions in some things you'll want to do... if you have the fretboard down, you'll know where all the notes you want are, and it won't be a problem for you.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@alex_)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 611
 

Whats the CAGED system?


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

It's a box scale system that relates five different fingering patterns to the open chords C-A-G-E-D. Nothing magic about it, really, just a clever name.

C = root on 4th finger 5th string
A = root on 2nd finger 5th string
G = root on 4th finger 6th string
E = root on 2nd finger 6th string
D = root on 2nd finger 4th string (involves a shift down 1 fret on strings 4/3)

You probably already know the fingerings for those, Alex. It's just a memory device for teaching, that's all.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@alex_)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 611
 

ohh.. those like, when your first taught them its always in that way..

wouldnt E be open though?

is this what your talking about, stuff like

E: 0---3--0
B: 0---2--1
G: 1---3--0
D: 2---0--2
A: 2---X--3
E: 0---X--X

---E---D--C

those chords?


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

All of them are open, as far as the origins of the fingerings (and the CAGED names) go... but all of the CAGED fingerings are closed boxes to make them moveable.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 611
 

similar to barre chords?


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

Alex,
This may be wrong, but I think it's the system outline in Bill Edwards's inexpensive but great little book Fretboard Logic, which I thought was really helpful about a year ago when I read it.

It sells for around $10 US and is well worth the price. You might want to check it out. And yes, it shows you all kinds of chord voicing and inversions based on barred C/A/G/E/D shapes. Pretty cool. Btw, I only know the first volume but understand that it's really the essential one.

Tim

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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