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When to play what

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(@viator)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 8
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Thanks again.

Eat rice!


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(@stratwrassler)
Active Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 17
 

...
I'm just starting on solos over backing tracks, so I'm trying to sort this all out. I've been using a simple A-D-E backing track. Please let me know if I'm getting this:

1) If I play the A blues scale, or the A minor pentatonic over this I'll get a bluesy sound.

2) If I move three frets toward the nut, I'll be playing the F# blues scale (or eliminate the "blue" note, and it's the F# minor pentatonic), and I will get a cheerier sound).

3) The big question - are these the "correct" scales to play over this progression under these circumstances? In other words, do I know what I'm talking about?...

Think of these "scales" as merely guides for your finger to get where they need to be to produce the sound you want.

Before you start playing, listen to the backing track, and sing or hum along until you come up with something good, then use theory to help track down where your fingers need to be to play it.

Peace
-Rick

Groove and Tone: If it don't got it, why play it?


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(@psychonik)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 268
 

Stratwrassler, I see we're going to get along here. Ive been thinking that for a very long time.

How I've pictured it is: make up the "rough copy" of the solo in hum, work it out on the guitar, and work out any tonal "glitches" that prevent it from sounding good, and keep toying with it every time you play the song. Eventually, you will have the scale down to a tee, and be able to apply it across the fretboard. Right now, all the songs our band plays are in the same key, using approximately the same scale, and we have almost mastered improvisation of almost every sscale in that key, because we've been playing it constantly for two months. Its not very cool that I have to use the other guitarist's spare guitar now, though. It makes practicing VERY difficult. :?

well, im rambling now.hope that helps


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(@stratwrassler)
Active Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 17
 

...Right now, all the songs our band plays are in the same key, using approximately the same scale, and we have almost mastered improvisation of almost every sscale in that key, because we've been playing it constantly for two months. ...
well, im rambling now.hope that helps

Ok, so now instead of improvising all the time, see how many good sounding little melodies or "ditties" you can come up with in that scale/key for each song.

Sorry, I'm falling into teacher mode.... heh..

Peace,
-Rick

Groove and Tone: If it don't got it, why play it?


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(@psychonik)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 268
 

lol that's ok, teacher mode is always a good thing.

What I was getting at in saying we've almost mastered improvisation in that scale, is that we play it so often that in my own head, I know every note cold, where it sounds good in relation to the note before, the note to follow, the notes of any chord...to the point where I could write a full song in that scale randomly without hitting a sour note. We write our songs first improvising the melody, then working with what we came up with, slowly making it coherent with the rest of the song, and the musical idea we're trying to convey.

I would suggest a scale change, but our singer has a VERY limited range, we'd have to change the tuning every time we wanted to change the key of the song. :?

it's a pain in the butt, but his lyrics are phenominal, and the scream he does is also amazing, and well implemented. I can say we're one of the more tasteful scream bands on the local scene, seeing as how the other guitarist and i made him cut the screams a little bit.


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(@call_me_kido)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 188
 

To determine what chords are in a specific major or minor key, I do one of two things.

1. Consult my psychic.

2. Flip a coin.

Heads = Only one chord in the song, the starting key chord.

Tails = Consult the audience, like on Who wants to be a Millionare, and ask what they think would be next. This is sometimes a bad idea because if there is no audience it can take a long time to finish the song.

Obviously J/K theres been alot of good prior input here so Im just killing some time at work.

Play safe.

Kido


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