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For What It's Worth

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(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
Topic starter  

Hi everyone!

Paul has kindly loaded my MP3s for this song and you'll find it also listed on the home page as the "featured lesson."  

Two main things covered here are:

1)  the E and A chords (and I'm sure we can have a lot of discussion on the A!)

2) the percussive stroke - whether you slap the strings or do a more of a palm muting thing, I think that everyone will find it helpful to discuss your experiences with it. And it might also be, as Olive so kindly pointed out in the Horse With No Name discussion that this isn't the easiest thing to write about.

Note on the MP3s that the first two examples I use my fingers for the strumming. No pick. I did grab a pick to demonstrate the "heel stroke" / palm muting simply because it's a lot easier to hear it that way.

See you on the boards.

Peace

 


   
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(@trudolfs)
Eminent Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 32
 

I could not say I have started on this one yet, but cant wait.

You got me curious on one thing. When you strum with your fingers, what finger(s) would that be, and what part for up and down strokes?

I myselt use my thumb. I stick it out and uses the outer edge of it, right next to the nail, both down and up. The upstroke gets a bit sharper, as it hits closer to the nail, but I think that goes well with the characteristics of the upstroke (high note first). And when I strum, I tend to wiggle it around a bit, cause that something I can do. I keep it stiff, and rotates it a bit around the inner joint (I tend to bee a bit bony:))


   
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(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
Topic starter  

I find I finger-strum in a lot of ways. Most often I'll go down with the thumb, pretty much as zc describes, but I usually do the upstroke with my index finger.

For a cool downstroke (no surprise to Alan and the other classical players - and a little help with the "technical" name for this?  ;) ) flick your fingers downward one at a time starting with the pinky and finishing with the index. You can do the reverse for an upstroke.

Peace


   
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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Isn't that the "Segovia Scratch"  :) :) :)

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
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(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 646
 

Well, technically it's known as a "rasquedo".

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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(@markyesme)
Estimable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Not to be pedantic, but "rasgueado".

The Easy Song Database: http://www2.shore.net/~maryesme/bin/easy.cgi

Take part in its creation: https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=7


   
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(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
Topic starter  

"let's call the whole thing off..."  ;)

(I hope everyone realizes that's a lame punch line!)

Peace


   
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(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 646
 

It's spelled many different ways.  Not being a native Spanish speaker, I am unable to decide between the different spellings on rational grounds.  I just picked one that looked right.

Rasguedo, rasquedo, rasgueado and rasqueado all seem to be used, even on Spanish sites.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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(@markyesme)
Estimable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Sorry for the pedantry.  Since I speak Spanish (being married to a Colombian and all), I often tilt at windmills.  Just ignore me and I'll go away soon.

The Easy Song Database: http://www2.shore.net/~maryesme/bin/easy.cgi

Take part in its creation: https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=7


   
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(@davidhodge)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4472
Topic starter  

Sorry for the pedantry.  Since I speak Spanish (being married to a Colombian and all), I often tilt at windmills.  Just ignore me and I'll go away soon.

Don't you dare!   ;)

Anyway, back to the discussion at hand (another pun!  ;) )...

Forgot to mention that one thing I see a bit is that people who strum with their fingers seem to (at least in my observations) put a lot more arm motion into the strum than people using picks. I tend to use the same motion (wrist/forearm) either way. What about you?

Peace


   
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(@stephen_brown)
Active Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 7
 

I gave up using my fingernails for strumming when I moved from classical to steel-strung guitar because the steel strings seemed to ruin my finger nails.  

Is this a common problem?  Maybe I have something wrong with my fingernail biochemistry ???


   
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(@markyesme)
Estimable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 153
 

I think I have the rhythm down and all (if I can get the muting right -- sometimes the high e keeps squealing, so I have to work on my technique some more), but it would be nice to have the comforting sound of the MP3s.  Any idea when the page will be updated?

The Easy Song Database: http://www2.shore.net/~maryesme/bin/easy.cgi

Take part in its creation: https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=7


   
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(@violet-s)
Reputable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 342
 

Buenos noches everyone ! (oops if that's mispelt)

Looking forward to the MP3s also, practising the two different strum patterns,doing OK

David, thanks for the laugh on the Guitar Noise suggestions Forum, couldn't stop laughing over " at the risk of sounding like a tired old windbag"

Shalom


   
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(@violet-s)
Reputable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 342
 

btw Mark, should that have been 'buenos tardes', should have stuck with ' Guten Abend' from my highschool German.

Here's a nice link for some downloads of classical guitar music:

http://www.guitarramagazine.com/magazine/index.asp

Back to this lesson, I'm getting the strumming down better, and understanding on the theory side about the circle of fifths mentioned in the musical genome project article  :)


   
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(@markyesme)
Estimable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 153
 

astokes, don't make me get all pedantic again!!!!!

"noche" and "tarde" are both feminine.  So, in either case, the correct would be "Buenas noches" or "Buenas tardes".  Generally, "Buenas Noches" has the connotation of separation (like you are leaving or going to bed), but that is not necessarily the case, as in some very formal or archaic settings it may be used in the form of a greeting.  "Buenas tardes" is almost exclusively an afternoon or early evening thing, but again, lines are fuzzy.  I am trying to remember how we greeted people at parties (which start pretty late in Colombia), but those were never formal so we probably just said stuff like "Hola" or "Que hubo" or whatnot.

Please, don't call up the pedantry.  In that regard I really am like Bruce Banner and turn into an ugly green monster.  

Mark :)

PS.  Let me know if you want links to classical and/or flamenco music you could play.

The Easy Song Database: http://www2.shore.net/~maryesme/bin/easy.cgi

Take part in its creation: https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=7


   
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