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Spoof Songs - Copyright?

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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

Hi!
So if I take some really cheesy 50' love song change the lyrics around to somthing funny and play the song with powerchords or whatever, basically make it to a modern punkrock song. Is there a way I could copyright that song? Or at least the lyrics?
Thanks!


   
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(@sjt1316)
Trusted Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 76
 

The lyrics - no problem.  The music, however, I'm not so sure about.  Someone else will have to chime in about that, as I think its a bit iffy of a topic...

--Steve
If you're enjoying it, are you still a struggling artist??
D~~n the man, save the Empire!


   
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(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
 

Considering how many of thsoe cheesy 50s songs had the same chord progression you might be able to get away with it. You'd just be copying a style rather than a song. Depends on how close you made the lyrics to the original at that point I think.

-Marv


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

Well, the lyrics have the same rhyme pattern, but only few words are in "the same position" as in the original.


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

Yeah Dude,
I belive the song your doing is called a parody. Im not positive though. This can be a thouch subject when it comes to copywriting. if you follow the same ryhmic patterners and form i.e AABA --> AABA, that might be a copywrite infringment. If you know the original writer you can check with the library of congress; a songs copywrite is nullified 50 years after the original compossers death. Im not 100% positive about the time line but im sure you can find out on the LOC web page .

Good luck hope i helped

Dirty Rotten


   
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(@ajcharron)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 121
 

Check that timeline: it used to be 50 years, then renewable for another 50. Now, I'm pretty sure they just moved it up to 100 years. Either way, it's their song. Whoever wrote the original gets full credits and royalties. Nevertheless, you can record it and play it.


   
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