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(@greg232)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 106
Topic starter  

I have been taking lessons now for about 2 months. I have learned a bunch of chords, power chords, and just started to work on some barre chords. I have been learning Hotel California, Wish you Were Here, and just started to learn everyone's favorite Stairway to Heaven all on acoustic. But, my wife just got laid off from her job today and due to finacial reasons I need to stop taking lessons for the time being.
My questions is can anyone recommend a decent DVD or book that I can use to keep learning. I love to play and do not what to stop. Any help or advice would be appreciated.

Greg


   
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(@metallicaman)
Honorable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 312
 

Really man theres no other way to go other then a hands on 1 on 1 teacher. I don't believe in those stupid, Play like a pro books or anything, Ive been in a jam like you and I just played tab for my favorite songs and tried to learn as MUCH as I could without the teacher at the time. I greatly improved just over simple tabs. So i reccomend Saving up, or just waiting til your wife gets a new job until starting lessons again. Its amazing how the teachers can show you the simples finger excercises but there IMPOSSIBLE. lol--- anyways Just try some of your fav songs in tab and just practice on your own otherwise I hear GN has some good info. :)

Sing Me A Song Your a Singer, Do me a wrong, your a bringer of evil. - Dio


   
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(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

In all seriousness -- figure out what you can do for your teacher and ask if they'll let you pay for the lessons in trade. Mow the guy's yard or wax his car or something . . .

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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(@voodoo_merman)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 368
 

Why not just teach yourself off of the internet? Most of the greatest rock and blues guitarists were all self taught. Give it a try.

At this time I would like to tell you that NO MATTER WHAT...IT IS WITH GOD. HE IS GRACIOUS AND MERCIFUL. HIS WAY IS IN LOVE, THROUGH WHICH WE ALL ARE. IT IS TRULY -- A LOVE SUPREME --. John Coltrane


   
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(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

Why not just teach yourself off of the internet? Most of the greatest rock and blues guitarists were all self taught. Give it a try.

Simply not true. Oh, maybe they didn't pay for lessons. But they had someone teaching them. They had mentors and people around them who were helping them every step of the way. People with great musical ears who could listen to what they were doing and point out the good and the bad, constantly directing them to how to be better players.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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 geoo
(@geoo)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2801
 

Havent seen many great books or DVDs but I agree totally with the practice on your own until you can take lessons again. Pick out a few tabs and go for it. At two months there probably are still ALOT of beginner lessons here at GN that will help you.

Geoo

“The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn” - David Russell (Scottish classical Guitarist. b.1942)


   
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(@voodoo_merman)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 368
 

Why not just teach yourself off of the internet? Most of the greatest rock and blues guitarists were all self taught. Give it a try.

Simply not true. Oh, maybe they didn't pay for lessons. But they had someone teaching them. They had mentors and people around them who were helping them every step of the way. People with great musical ears who could listen to what they were doing and point out the good and the bad, constantly directing them to how to be better players.

Really? Ok. "My bad" :o

I still think its a good idea to teach yourself for awhile though greg232. I have an uncle who is completely blind and he taught himself to play while in the process of losing his sight. And, he is one of the best guitarists on the island.

Make out for awhile on your own. Going w/o lessons for awhile wont kill ya.

At this time I would like to tell you that NO MATTER WHAT...IT IS WITH GOD. HE IS GRACIOUS AND MERCIFUL. HIS WAY IS IN LOVE, THROUGH WHICH WE ALL ARE. IT IS TRULY -- A LOVE SUPREME --. John Coltrane


   
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(@michhill8)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 420
 

Agreed, try teaching yourself for awhile, that way, you learn to the point where you would be able to teach someone else. Obviously this will help you, I've been playing 2 years, self taught, and I feel that I could stack up against anyone who has 2 years with a teacher. My opinion that is.

Thanks Dudes!
Keep on Rockin'

Pat


   
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(@70chevelle)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 35
 

Greg 232, I've been self teaching for about two months now. I printed off most of the beginner lessons from this sight, plus a lot of the easy song lessons from D. Hodge. They are great and have mp3 files so you can hear what it's supposed to sound like. I really don't have the time to take lessons. My 2 daughters are very active, which keeps my wife & I running most week nights and weekends. I started out with the intention of doing something with my youngest in the evenings after we finally get home, but she just isn't ready yet. I have $5 Mel Bay and Hal Leonard books, they don't come with the CD, which gives me a little structure. I have a 3" ring binder filled with lessons, tabs, info on chords, scales, and on and on, all printed off the internet. I do plan on taking lessons at some point, but it just can't be right now. It seems from your post that your decision has been made for you, at least for the short term. Don't sweat it. Download some "free" lessons and keep going until your situation changes, and then pick the lessons back up. Good luck.


   
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(@thectrain)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 126
 

The problem with teaching yourself is that it requires alot of discipline and you have to be real about your playing. Its hard to keep learning new stuff instead of just noodling or learning tab. Basically with enough effort you can move along at a similar pace to someone who is taking lessons. But it is definitley easier if you have a good teacher who will tell you whats what when something isn't up to snuff.


   
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(@the-dali)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1409
 

Another option is to find some people who play guitar around you (perhaps friends or people you work with) and set up some group time to play. If you can find the right person or persons, you'd be amazed at how you can grab cool information while simply "being" with others who play. Sitting at home trying to play is tough, but if you can find a fellow enthuisiast who is willing to chill out and play once a week (or every other week) it can be really beneficially for both of you.

-=- Steve

"If the moon were made of ribs, would you eat it?"


   
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(@muddy)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 63
 

To sit at home and self teach oneself can be very helpfull if the time is used wisely.. the best teacher in the world can not help u if you cannot get the fingers to go where u want them to.. to me a teacher can help u with ideas. but the best way to aid yourself to to do the mindless actions of walking up and down with scales or just patterns. then when a you need to call upon the fingers to do something they can instead of the frustrated finger folly.
good book is fretboard logic
and as always playing with others can give the most elusive thing..TIMING

LIVELY UP YOURSELVES!!


   
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(@djdubb)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 222
 

Like mostly everyone said you should be able to find a good dvd or book with the cd so you slow what your working on down.
Also you can study someone ones style through the tab or the breakdown writing in books before each song, it's like having your own personal lesson. My Hal Leonard books are full of highlights.

Good luck and rock on!!!!

"Failure is the key to success" Lee Wen; Champ vs Champ


   
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(@johnin510)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 69
 

Some of the best books are written by William Leavitt (Berklee Press). The books have 3 levels of learning guitar methods.

http://www.berkleepress.com/catalog/category-browse?category_id=19

These books are on Steve Vai's check list of good instruction books.


   
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(@sarton)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 95
 

I've been learning on my own. The 'net is the best source for learning materials. Imho, the books/vids available at music stores are not worth the price when compared to what's available online (for free). That's not to say I haven't bought any books, but I've been very selective in what I have purchased.

Discipline is the key (as previously mentioned). It's difficult to keep pushing oneself in new directions. I try to alternate things I do. I also try to pick tabs/songs that require use of my weak skills.

hth

A sucking chest wound is Nature's way of telling you to slow down.

Godin Freeway Classic, PodXT Live, Seymour-Duncan 84-50.
(All this so I could learn 'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little' Star for my youngest.)


   
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