Skip to content
Are there sizes tha...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Are there sizes that define an acoustic guitars shape?

6 Posts
6 Users
0 Likes
985 Views
Rich_Halford
(@rich_halford)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 225
Topic starter  

Are there any? Or is it just the general shape?

We all refer to various naming conventions for different shaped guitars: Parlour, Dreadnought, Jumbo, 000, Grand Concert, Grand Auditorium and so on, so does anyone know if any standard size definitions exist, even if its just within one manufacturer?

For example, Taylor Guitars have:
GS is 16 1/4 wide and 4 5/8 deep (Jumbo? or just a new size/shape for Taylor to replace their old Jumbo?)
GA is 16 wide and 4 5/8 deep (Grand Auditorium)
DN is 16 wide and 4 5/8 deep (Dreadnought)
GC is 15 wide and 4 3/8 deep (Grand Concert)

Whereas I am sure I read somewhere that Gibsons SJ200 (Super Jumbo) is 17 inches wide, but I can't find the details on Gibsons site.

The reason I ask is that I recently bought a 'Jumbo' and I was suprised that its nearly the same size/shape as a Taylor GA, its just deeper.

Just curious.


   
Quote
Musenfreund
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

Interesting question -- the names certainly imply shapes and something about size, but I really don' t know if the sizes are standard or if each maker might develop its own standards.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
ReplyQuote
Rahul
(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2736
 

I know about Dreadnought. It was the biggest guitar when it was produced first by Martin Guitar Company. So much so that it dreaded nothing. So, even sizes got some serious history. 8)


   
ReplyQuote
kingpatzer
(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

Are there any? Or is it just the general shape?

The measurements that really define an acoustic or hollow-body guitar are: neck length, typically measured in inches; the width of the boughs; the depth of the sides; the width of the neck; the curvature of the fret board.

As an example, my favorite guitar has a 25 1/4" neck, is 17" at the upper bough, 14 3/4" at the lower bough, is 3" deep, has a 2 3/16" width neck, and a conical radius fret board that ranges from 10 - 16".

Because there is enormous variability in these measurements, as well as for marketing reasons within each company, there are no standard naming conventions for even the common size permutations.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
ReplyQuote
Hyperborea
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 827
 

I know about Dreadnought. It was the biggest guitar when it was produced first by Martin Guitar Company. So much so that it dreaded nothing. So, even sizes got some serious history. 8)

I thought that the name "dreadnought" was in reference to the "Great War" (World War I or "War to end all wars") large British battleship. It was the technological marvel of it's day and it was also very big for it's day which led to the name being used for the large Martin guitar which at the time was larger than "standard" guitars.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
ReplyQuote
dogbite
(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

I just saw a thread at Harmony Central that would be a good read.
read down a few posts and you will see someone had posted a very nice chart showing size profiles. informative.here is the link....
http://acapella.harmony-central.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1958495

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
ReplyQuote