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Blues question, been bugging me for awhile

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(@jasonrunguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 273
 

I think if you take the advice from Arjen/Wes (the theory aspect) and mix it with Alan's advice (the practice, practice, practice routine) then you'll really be on to something. This was a really good thread; I know what I'm doing for practice tonight

-Jason
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To those about to rock, we salute you!
http://www.soundclick.com/jasonwittenbach


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(@nexion)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 536
 

Remember, you can know all there is to know about "correct" theory and what not, but what is best is someone that is playing from their soul.

In my opinion a great guitarist isn't the one that follows perfect blues format and progression, but the guitarist that really digs deep for emotions and puts them out in sound waves for the audience to connect to.

I'm not saying that someone following theory isn't putting emotion into it, but theory based music always feels sterile TO ME.

"That’s what takes place when a song is written: You see something that isn’t there. Then you use your instrument to find it."
- John Frusciante


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

You're looking at it the wrong way. Theory isn't in place of emotion. It gives you tools that you can use to better express emotion.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

I'm not saying that someone following theory isn't putting emotion into it, but theory based music always feels sterile TO ME.

All music is theory based, whether you know it or not. BB king is playing blues according to theory, not because he 'lacks soul' but because theory describes what he is doing.


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 geoo
(@geoo)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2823
 

not because he 'lacks soul' but because theory describes what he is doing.

Hypothetically.

Jim

“The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn” - David Russell (Scottish classical Guitarist. b.1942)


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

That little lesson I posted was intentionally simple. I wanted to show how changing one single note in a riff could lead a listener's ear through a progression.

But you shouldn't follow this like a method with every riff you play. People will catch on to that quick. :D

But it is good to know where these target notes are and throw them in now and then.

But I have to agree with Arjen. If you are playing the Blues scale (or any scale), you are following theory. The scales just tell you where the good notes are. How you play them is up to you.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@michhill8)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 420
Topic starter  

this is a really good thread.

Thanks Dudes!
Keep on Rockin'

Pat


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

Tinsmith: that's an interesting idea which can be approached from many angles. Let's take the Am-Dm progression, lead-wise. If you 'stay in A' during the D-part you are actually adding notes to the D-section: Dm (D F A) + Am (A C E)=Dm9. The same goes for Dm->Em: Em (E G B) + Dm/no5 (D F)=Em9b. The D is a natural part of the seventh chord and the 9b will make an even more powerfull move back to Am as the note F resolves to the note E in an awesome manner. Finally, Em->Am is also very nice. Em (E G B) + Am (A C E)=A9. So in short, by 'staying in the previous chord' you are enriching the progression from Am-Dm-Em into Am9-Dm9-Em9b.

What I'm also try to get at is......

Say for example you're playing blues in A at the fifth fret.

Now act as though there's a capo at the 4th or 5th fret and play the D & E as though they are first postion chords & limit yourself to the three or four frets within your reach of the first position style chords. This helps mix it up instead of going to the 1st, 4th & 5th of the chord positions which make the lead so predictable.

At that position you have a D, A & E style chords


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(@hockey-rocker)
New Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3
 

This is very interesting and helpful. I would just add that within the context of the excellent theoretical observations already described, it is a good idea to use your hammer-ons, pull-offs, bends and vibrato. The Ronnie Earl DVD suggests to play a lead with only three notes, fret positions really, using your tecnique to exhibit your inner-passion via the Blues guitar form. That lesson was big for me. This is also good stuff. Combining both ideas is killer. Thanks.


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(@xposed)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 107
 

mchill, check out these videos for some clarity to your question:

http://www.guitargrind.com/category/6-blues.html


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