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Do I really need to use a guitar humidifier?

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(@cattchels)
New Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 1
 

It really depends on the climate where you live. Sudden changes in humidity is what damages any stringed instrument. If you live an area with a fairly stable humidity level, then they are not necessarily necessary, although having one won't hurt. If you live in an area with wild humidity changes, like I do, it really helps out. Our house is full of instruments so we just keep a humidifier in the room where we keep all of our instruments.


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

My Guild D55 suddenly developed a split under the bridge that went from there to the end of the lower bout. I was heart broken.

I had it fixed....it was hydrated then repaired with a cleat. The next year...the same spot plus another split 2" away from the other.

Keeping the guitar in the case with the PW humidifier....it saved my baby. I use two in the case & it stays hydrated.
I don't know how the new style works, but the old style still works.

Beware of fancy guitars with nice binding & solid tops.


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(@kroikey)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 232
 

I recently bought a Baby Taylor BT1 acoustic from the Guitar Centre in Las Vegas while on a poker holiday. It came with a lot of humidity care sheets, but now I'm back in the North East of England I'm wondering if its necessary. The guitar was only $280 and so i'm not massively scared of humidity issues.


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(@speaknow15)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 1
 

I live in PA and I was wondering if you need you specificly use a guitar humidifier. Can you use a baby humidifier instead?


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(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1885
 

I live in PA and I was wondering if you need you specificly use a guitar humidifier. Can you use a baby humidifier instead?
Anything that keeps the environment around the guitar at a stable 45%-55% relative humidity will do the job.
Anything from a guitar case humidifier, to a whole house humidifier.
If you're not using a purpose-made device, you should also have a method of measuring the humidity in the area.

It's the humidity that's the goal, not how you get there.

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


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(@staffan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 125
 

Great advice! So, is this all applicable also for solid body electric guitars - or are we mainly talking about acoustics here?

AAAFNRAA
- Electric Don Quixote -


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(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1885
 

Mainly acoustics, but hollowbody electrics can be affected as well.
Basically anything that has raw un-coated wood exposed is susceptible to humidity changes.

If you have any un-finished wood, it can shrink and crack in low humidity.

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


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(@staffan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 125
 

Right, thanks Kent_eh!

I actually went out and bought a humidifier a couple of weeks ago for my Martin D-15. I went for one of those models, that you put under the strings - in the SOUNDHOLE of the acoustic... I believe the brand was Keyzer (or Kaizer) - anyway; german word for "emperor" but with a funny spelling

The way it works, is that it´s got a "sponge-type-thingie" in a black, round shaped, plastic/rubber-casing. You soak the whole device in water, take it out, squeeze the plastic/rubber-casing to get rid of excess water and then wipe the outside dry with a cloth. Put the mother in the soundhole and Bob´s yer uncle!

It lasts (i.e "stays moist") about a week-and-a-half - at this time of year in Stockholm, Sweden - and then I have to do the whole soak-process over again.

I guess it´s working - but then again; how can you tell? :) I guess, as long as no cracks appear on my acoustic - it´s doing it´s job!

Good thing I found this thread - thanks everyone!

AAAFNRAA
- Electric Don Quixote -


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(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1885
 

I guess it´s working - but then again; how can you tell?
Lack of damage to your guitar is definitely a desirable result.

If you want to know what the humidity is, get an inexpensive hygrometer.
An easy and affordable source is a shop that sells good cigars and accessories

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

Well since the last bridge repair, I've been using an Oasis Rehydrator.......seems to use more water so....it humidifies more in my eyes.
http://macnichol.com/product/oasis-re-hydrator-humidifier


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(@staffan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 125
 

If you want to know what the humidity is, get an inexpensive hygrometer.
An easy and affordable source is a shop that sells good cigars and accessories

- Thanks, I´ll check it out and probably get one before spring arrives (at the moment there´s no doubt that the indoor-air is dry as the desert; with static electricity happening all the time and my own lips and skin are falling apart. That´s Sweden in the winter time for ya! :-)

AAAFNRAA
- Electric Don Quixote -


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

in spring you don't need it. You need it NOW.


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