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(@fiberoptik)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 86
Topic starter  

This probably belongs in the begginer section but is thier any difference note wise between an Eb and a D#? I am trying to learn Seethers Broken, The Tuning should Be Starting from High D#, A#, F#, C#, G#, D#. What is this paticuliar tunning called? Anyway, when trying to tune this, My Chromatic Korg GA-30 goes from E - Eb - D <--- :roll: No D# in there :) It seems to "hear" the other #'s just fine.


   
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(@danrobertson)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 35
 

Even I can answer the first part :) Yes D# and Eb are the same note. I guess the way you could look at as when you were ascending from D to the next note then you would call that D# and when descending from E you would call it Eb.

Dont know the name of the tuning, detuned hell? :D


   
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(@fiberoptik)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 86
Topic starter  

Lmao
Ok I thought so.. thanks for the reply.. So is it common to always call Interval notes by #'s or doesnt matter?


   
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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

It depends what key you're in.

First of all, no key will ever have both sharps and flats - either sharps or flats, but never both.

To some degree, it's convenience whether a scale is name # or b. Take your example, Db contains 5 flats - Gb, Db, Ab, Eb, Bb, whereas C# contains 7 sharps - F#, C#, G#, D#, A#, E#, B#
Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C
C# D# E# F# G# A# B#

The way a tuner decides, whether a note is to displayed as sharp or flat, is likely to be up to the mind of the design engineer.

CLick here to see the relationship between scales and their sharps/flats.

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