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Every scale you'll ever need

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(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

Check this link out. Whether you want the blues scale or a byzantine scale its here!
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

That's pretty cool,
You can pick any position and it gives you a tab as well.
Thanks for the link.


   
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(@dan-t)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5044
 

That's a pretty cool site. Thanks for posting it.

"The only way I know that guarantees no mistakes is not to play and that's simply not an option". David Hodge


   
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(@chris-c)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3454
 

Excellent. Thanks.

By a lucky coincidence I was planning to do a bit more work and research on scales today, so the timing was perfect. :)

I find that one of the best learning tools is a plain old pencil and paper. So I've got a stack of blank necks printed out ready to add scales to.

I've bookmarked that link, and can easily transcribe some of the scales onto the paper.

If anybody thinks that sounds like more work than just printing out a screen-shot, you're right - it is more work. But that's the point. The act of writing it out first is a great way to help learn the layout. At least it is for me, I need all the help I can get with memorising things!

Thanks for the link.


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Chris,
It actually goes deeper than that.
When you write something down rather that just look at it or say it.
It actually comunicates the idea directly to your subconcious mind.
It is a trick to really learning things. I don't know who first figured this out but it works very well.
Something about writing comunicates to a different part of your brain.


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

That's a good site. Here's another: http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/guitar/index_rb.html

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@mr_clean001)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 88
 

Wow guys - great sites. I bookmarked both of them. Thanks!

"Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest...if it makes you
feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers.
Then you'll know you're on to something!"
- Ted Nugent


   
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 Mike
(@mike)
Famed Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2892
 

Here is another one.

You can never have enough. :lol:

Edit - Opps.....Ricochet posted the same one. :oops: Next time I'll look at the links first. :oops:


   
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(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

Er, what on earth are those scales in Richocet's link called like "mela latangi" and "mela vanaspati" etc? lol :?
Oh and what is that prometheous scale supposed to be used for??


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Melas are a classification within raga - Indian music. There are many, many ragas - in some systems, thousands. With so many scales to choose from, there are a half dozen classification systems that have come up.

One of the more useful systems was created by Venkatamakhin... it classifies scales with seven notes as melas.

The 'Promthius scale' is from Scriabin's composition 'Promethius' (1908). Scriabin thought of this as a "mystic chord" It's basically the first three major scale tones, doubled at the augmented fourth.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

I am an indian so i know about them.And there are more RAGAS then you can ever imagine. :wink: Examples are Raag Malkos , Raag Kafi , Raag Behravin (Maybe you are not getting a word of it , these are hindi words)
And such raags are best played on harmonium , the traditional indian instrument.Indian music is just too deep and too wide in scope.Its a never ending well of knowledge :)


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Hey Simon, whatever they're "supposed" to be used for, there they are. Something else you can play with when you feel like you're getting in a rut. :D

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@cschooley)
New Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2
 

These are great sites - I have been playing for about 15 years, but totally in a rut. I bought the guitar grimoire, and I am really trying to re-learn guitar from the theory up, so to speak.

I have even bought some books on sight reading, and am digging through the basement looking for my old Mickey Baker book. Don't laugh.

All these scale sites are good resouces, but I am wondering if anybody knows of some good ways to go about 'assimilating' these scales.

I am working commiting to memory the major scale in every key on every postion of the neck, and then I am guessing that I can retain other scales due to their relation to the major scale (I hope).

The Grimoire says as much: "It will benefit you greatly to memorize the numerics for all 12 keys, but until then we have...".

So my current routine is to practice a scale in a postion until I can say the note names forward and backward - then move on - then come back because I forgot it.

So I am only on the 2nd postion of the F major scale - like the 2nd diagram of the book. I am not worried that this is taking so long because I assume that as I become familiar with the major scale in one key it will come easier in the others - please tell me I am right :-)

I am hoping as I get more familiar with the major scale in all keys all over the neck I will be able to look at a new scale, see the intervals between the tones and play it all over the neck in an arbitraty key. I said I was *hoping* okay. Does that sound like a logical approach to learning the fretboard and some scales?


   
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(@undercat)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 959
 

Another one that I've tapped many times in guitar career is:

http://activeguitar.com/basics/

Same kind of deal: pick any scale/chord/arpeggio and bang.

Do something you love and you'll never work a day in your life...


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

...and another

http://www.jguitar.com/scale

Also, do a chord search while your there. It's cool.

http://www.jguitar.com/chordsearch


   
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