Skip to content
Notifications
Clear all

Feeling?

82 Posts
29 Users
0 Likes
9,117 Views
 Long
(@long)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 28
Topic starter  

What do people mean when they say that a solo has/has not feeling? I really don't understand and I am seriously not joking. Do they mean vibrato or funny faces, or what; because metal music (which I'm personally not a fan of, though there's nothing wrong with it) can contain vibrato and funny faces, yet it's accused of not having feeling. Can anybody clarify?


   
Quote
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Basically what it means when a person says that a guitarist plays with feeling means they like the music. When they aren't playing with feeling, they don't particularly like the music. It's just taste is all.


   
ReplyQuote
(@stengah)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 87
 

It's the difference between mechanically moving through a series of notes, that in theory should work, as opposed to playing a note combination because it sounds "right" or makes you feel a certian way when you play it.


   
ReplyQuote
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

yeah, it's the funny faces. that's what music is all about. nobody really cares about the sounds. funny faces and vibrato. that's it.


   
ReplyQuote
 Long
(@long)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 28
Topic starter  

I don't think that I've ever really been moved enough by guitar work, with the possible exception of Dark was the Night, to label a song as having feeling.

I think this describes my situation

http://www.qwantz.com/index.pl?comic=735


   
ReplyQuote
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

get a life. get burned. listen to more music. play more.

emotions are generally spontaneous and personal. you don't have to have the same ones as whoever is talking to you.


   
ReplyQuote
(@clockworked)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 214
 

Feeling is kind of a subjective thing, two people can play the same piece and with each other's little idiosyncrasies of playing, it can sound totally different. The way a guitarist seems to put his spin on an individual piece of music, the way he seems to conjure up varying parts of the song he's playing can make him sound unique, and lend to the idea that he's "feeling" the song a bit more than someone who goes and just blows right through the piece. You can be technically sound, but still lack feeling.

Feeling (to me, anyway) can be briefly described in the way you go about playing a particular song to tie into an emotional representation through the guitar.. a couple ways I've seen feeling expressed could be through..

  • Muting notes in certain areas (this can give a piece a chunky feeling [see Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Rude Mood" -- the chunky feeling gives it, as SRV himself said -- a "rude mood" type of feel, and I tend to agree.)
  • Bending notes -- varying your bends from a full-step to 3/4th, to a half a step to 1/4th. You can push them up, than pull them down. Hendrix did this well, and listen to pieces by B.B. King as an example here. He's renown for his vibrato (the opening to B.B.'s "The Thrill is Gone" is an example of this.. just the way the song starts, with that opening lick -- it tends to give the listener a feeling of "things have changed.")
  • Sliding from note to note -- one of the fine examples I've seen of sliding in popular music is Neil Young's Cortez the Killer, just the way he slides around on the fretboard and than as the song progresses he mixes some sliding in with bending.. it builds the song nicely. He lends that playing to match the theme of the song -- almost the surreal nature of Cortez's killing spree.
  • The techniques themselves are rudimentary, but it's the way they're used and explored that can communicate. It's hard to describe feeling, but I can tell you that ostensibly it has nothing to do with the look of your facial features during a song. I've seen guys like Clapton play a song like Wonderful Tonight and pull off these most soulful looks on their faces during bends.. and than I'll see the same look on some other guy playing some cheap hack of a song to a bunch of kids. It wasn't the face that communicated feeling, though I'll tell ya', that other guy sure tried to feel it.

    Used to be, was a part of me felt like hiding.. but now it comes through. Comes through to you.


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@anonymous)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 17 years ago
    Posts: 8184
     

    i think some notes are easier for some people to reach with a little face-english. some notes make my head involuntarily drop off to one side. some beats make me nod my head, or tap my foot, or whatever. some vocals make me want to sing along.


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@clockworked)
    Reputable Member
    Joined: 18 years ago
    Posts: 214
     

    i think some notes are easier for some people to reach with a little face-english.

    Especially that D# on the high E string at the 23rd fret. Personally, in trying to reach that my facial-english looks more cardiac-attack than soulful.

    Used to be, was a part of me felt like hiding.. but now it comes through. Comes through to you.


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@ignar-hillstrom)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 21 years ago
    Posts: 5349
     

    Emotion is the byproduct of our rather poorly constructed brains. In general emotion is caused by two procedures:

    1) A solo-line sounds like vocals. Humans are trained from the day they're born to recognize emotion in human voices. That's very handy because it pays of to know when someone is sad/angry/scared etc. Now because our brains are such pieces of junk we tend to have difficulty seperating real voices from 'fake' voices, as long as the fake voice has some characteristics of a real voice. This indeed means vibrato, smooth transition to notes (bends on a guitar, slides on a violin), some variations in tempi instead of mechanical rhythms etc. This has absolutely *nothing* to do with actual emotion whatsoever, it's a 'trick'.

    2) The music is linked to some earlier event. Either directly, for example when you heared that song the day you met your girlfriend, or indirectly, where music resembles a tune you heared during an important event or part of your life. This is why older people can talk for days about how emotion the 70s music is, and why the technology that was used is so much better then anything there is now. Their parents can tell you that accoustic music and bigband is far more emotional. My generation will tell the next that trance is so much better, and we'll be able to explain why digital is so much more emotional.

    Some minor notes about emotion:

    -people respond *very* poorly to new sounds. If you want people to feel emotion, stick to the same old progressions and licks. Remember: the more boring, predictable and lame a song is the *easier* it is to detect emotion. So whip out your blues progressions or write a great C Am F G song.
    -people like to detect 'original emotion', so pretend your boring piece is original in one way or the other, while still keeping with the rule above.
    -Emotion is caused by a combination of stimuli. People can detect emotion much faster if you pull faces.
    -People are stupid. Write songs about fake emotions like love, and really hammer the 'emotion' down their throats. Make sure you really emphasize words like 'love' 'you' and 'never'. Pull espescially emotional faces during these words.
    -People cannot accept that individual taste is just that, individual and personal, so they will try to have you believe their tastes are 'better'. Usually emotion is used as an argument and they'll try to make you feel like you are an emotionless ape. Don't feel bad about it, 'experts' need some fake way to objectify their taste to proof they are indeed experts.

    General rule: the more people talk of emotion the less actual skills they got. Actually, the more people talk at all the less skills they have. :P


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@kingpatzer)
    Noble Member
    Joined: 19 years ago
    Posts: 2171
     

    "Playing with emotion" is one of those "gotcha" phrases that don't really mean anything, but at the same time holds the key to really great playing.

    Emotions don't mean diddly when it comes to the physical act of playing music. The ability to produce particular sounds is a matter of technical skills properly applied.

    However, the ability to apply those technical skills in a way that does more than just produce sound, but also produces sounds in a way that creates the intended audience to have an intended emotional response to the sound created is increadibly important.

    And key here is the point about the "intended audience." As Sleutelbos notes, unfamiliar music will not be recieved in the same way as familiar music. Thus, someone who has never listened to Jazz might listen to some terrific Al DiMeola solo and hear nothing but a cacophony whereas someone who is used to listening to modern jazz will hear great emotion.

    This reality is replayed every generation as the 40-somethings complain that their teenagers listen to nothing but noise, while the teenagers think their parents are insane because they can't appreciate the great emotional content of their music . . .

    "The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@misanthrope)
    Noble Member
    Joined: 18 years ago
    Posts: 2261
     

    I think you can play whilst feeling emotion and feel that your emotion is part of the music, and I think that people can feel emotion from music they listen to and feel like they're feeling what the player is feeling. Whether it's actually there or not doesn't really seem relevant to me - the implication is real to the player, the inference is real to the listener and the recording doesn't care either way :wink:

    ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@anonymous)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 17 years ago
    Posts: 8184
     

    a bunch of bitter b.s.

    get over yourself. people use music to communicate emotions and ideas they're actually feeling. the blues didn't come over from africa because they were commercial or emotionally manipulative. there aren't always words to communicate how we feel. music is as much a part of being human as chirping is part of being a bird. we've artificially separated ourselves from it, but it's part of who we are. we have huge chunks of our brains that light up due to it.

    as for new music not being received well, well... older minds have trouble processing new information in general, but i remember being 3 and 4 years old and hearing all sorts of stuff for the first time and being completely engrossed. even now, at 26, i'll hear something from time to time that makes the rest of the world disappear. people can take music to new places, even be revolutionary, while being deeply steeped in tradition and having command over those traditional song forms. look at stravinski. he moved people, and it was so contrary to the audience's socialized expectations that they rioted. you don't think new music has an emotional effect? just because something isn't pretty, doesn't mean it isn't real.
    it's like language, telling a story. we all learn words and sentence constructions growing up. we find out how our words affect those around us... and yet, language is constantly evolving, (does thou dig, my nizzle?) and some people use language to uplift(think mandela or king or ghandi), some use it to devastate(think your ex-girlfriend), some use it to enlighten(e=mc2. pretty powerful for just 5 symbols), some just bore the poop out of you (such as sleutebos :lol: ), and some simply have no idea what they're doing (anyone gonna be surprised if i mention g w bush here?).


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@ignar-hillstrom)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 21 years ago
    Posts: 5349
     

    How mature Jason. I am perfectly aware what emotion is, quite a few of my tunes are actually perceived by others as being 'emotional music'. I am also reasonably informed about how our brains function. I personally just prefer to stay clear of pseudo-artsy rants about it unless one can actually say something solid about it. For what it's worth, you still haven't answered the original question about what exactly emotion in music is. I gave it my best shot, how about you trying it for yourself. Maybe even *gasp* show us some of your deepest emotional music so we know what you're ranting about.

    Or just talk others down, it's not that your opinion matters that much to me...


       
    ReplyQuote
    (@anonymous)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 17 years ago
    Posts: 8184
     

    i've posted my music and i play out. i've made people cry, and i've made people woop and cheer, and i've made people leave the room in disgust. i've also left people bored or unaffected.

    i'm not going to answer the question because it's a ridiculous one to me. we all know what emotions are. we all have them. we all have triggers for them. i'm not going to pretend to be a pseudo-intellectual grad student writing a dissertation on the causes of emotion.

    if i went onto an art website and said i didn't care about oil paintings, and nothing ever painted with oil-based paints ever moved me, and asked them to tell me what it was about oil-based painting that moves people... i'm pretty sure at least one person would tell me i'm missing the point, or at least a few steps along the way.

    edit: however, if someone said that all you have to do to get people to like you is to draw a naked chick, and that all art is, is drawing naked chicks, (or happy little clouds or whatever) i'd wanna smack them upside the head.


       
    ReplyQuote
    Page 1 / 6