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Great quote from Carlos in this issue of Vintage Guitar

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(@lava-man)
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Carlos Santana always knows how to put things and this is great example from this issue of Vintage Guitar:

Well, I listened to what Miles said. He said, “First listen don't play. Then feel. And then whatever you think you want to play, don't play that; play the stuff around it.” That's pretty clear. Leaving space. There's nothing worse than a person who doesn't respect commas or periods. Same thing with music. If you hear a guitar player playing a million notes per second, it's like a machine gun. Listen to Wes Montgomery, man, or Bola Sete, Gabor Szabo. The real ones they leave space. So you can swallow the note. You can't just keep shoving things in your mouth; you've got to chew and swallow once in awhile.

You can't put it any better than that...

Lava Man
http://www.lavacable.com


   
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(@gnease)
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Perfect! Real musicians know when to shut up, and are much better because of that.

-=tension & release=-


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Great quote of Santana, strongly disagree with Mr. Davis though...


   
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(@wes-inman)
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I thought that was fantastic advice. I think many players overplay. I don't care if you have the greatest technique in the world, when you hear a million notes it is BORING. It has no character, soul, or feeling.

I love the guitar solo Marc Bolan of T Rex played on his great hit Bang a Gong.

He played one single note. But it was awesome. 8)

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@dagwood)
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I love the guitar solo Marc Bolan of T Rex played on his great hit Bang a Gong.

He played one single note. But it was awesome. 8)

Just the one? I think I still have a chance :)

Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing. - Wernher Von Braun (1912-1977)


   
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(@dogbite)
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I get Vintage Guitar delivered. a good mag.
I was a fan of Santana from the get go. the interview was great because he addressed his early days.

another good qoute.
he was talking about other guitarists that impressed him. no matter how har he tried he couldnt sound like them....'no matter what I do Im not going to sound like Paco de Lucia or Al Dimeola...good or bad , Im going to sound like me...I just think of three things. It's like combining joy, anger, and orgasim into one'

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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(@wes-inman)
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Just the one? I think I still have a chance :D

That was in the middle of the song, but Marc slid into the note and put his superb vibrato on it. Nobody had a vibrato like Marc Bolan.

At the end of the song he goes all out and plays a long solo. I counted all the notes. It was 20. 8)

A few years ago they had a nice ongoing special about Jazz on PBS. It was a fantastic series. I was really impressed by Count Basie. They said Basie was a real people person, he would place his piano out on the floor among the patrons. He was constantly talking to the crowd, especially the young ladies while the band played. Then he would say "Excuse me for a moment" and play some short but unbelieveable riff on his piano. Then he would go back to chatting with the crowd.

This was the secret to Count Basie's style. He would leave the crowd begging for more. He would tease you with his greatness.

Count Basie Audio Clips

Some people forget that the "rest" is a part of music.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@simonhome-co-uk)
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Even being into shredding myself, I totally agree. You cant just shred and shred non stop. Thats what I hate about how Yngwie Malmsteen has become these days - Its like he thinks he is the fastest player in the world (FAR from it) and so he just improvies the same shred licks over and over, instead of actually playing the song he composed. You watch his early days playing, its much less aggressive and more controlled and varied, rather than self indulgent.
Fast playing should one of many tools at your dispossal, not all of your playing


   
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(@noteboat)
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A few years ago they had a nice ongoing special about Jazz on PBS. It was a fantastic series. I was really impressed by Count Basie. They said Basie was a real people person, he would place his piano out on the floor among the patrons. He was constantly talking to the crowd, especially the young ladies while the band played. Then he would say "Excuse me for a moment" and play some short but unbelieveable riff on his piano. Then he would go back to chatting with the crowd.

This was the secret to Count Basie's style. He would leave the crowd begging for more. He would tease you with his greatness.

Les Paul told a similar story about Basie in the December 2005 issue of Guitar Player:
I've never forgotten hearing Count Basie one night out on the West Coast. He was in a wheelchair, and they pushed him up this ramp, and got him seated at the piano. All of a sudden, the band breaks, and Count Basie's hand comes down, and he hits one note. Now that was the most precious note I've ever heard, and it laid me flat out.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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