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(@iliketheguitar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 124
Topic starter  

Hey I wanted to start out messing with tunings and stuff like sonic youth.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips on where to start er sumthin

thnks in advance


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(@citizennoir)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1248
 

Er....
Um, First you gotta get Kim Gordon to marry you :P

Then pick a random tuning for each string.
And don't use any real chord fingerings.
Make sure you and yer bandmates are playing all in a different key.
Play as loud as you can.
Use as many effects as you can.
Use Burrough's 'cut up' technique on yer master tapes.
Come up with a great version of the Leon Russel/Bonnie Bramlet penned song 'SuperStar'
in honor of Karen Carpenter

And that should get you pretty close.

Hope that helps.
Good luck,
and be sure to post a recording for us.

Ken

"The man who has begun to live more seriously within
begins to live more simply without"
-Ernest Hemingway

"A genuine individual is an outright nuisance in a factory"
-Orson Welles


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(@steve-0)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1165
 

You like Sonic Youth? Learn some Sonic Youth TABS (or notation) with alternate tunings. You can buy TABS online or at most music stores (most are willing to order books if they don't carry them).

Steve-0


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(@embrace_the_darkness)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 540
 

You can tune your guitar to any tuning you want - however, in reality there are tunings that are more used than others.

Check out http://www.tunemybass.com/ and choose the "6 string guitar" option to see a bunch of different tunings available, complete with a sound-guide to help you tune to.

One thing to note, if you plan to change the tuning on your guitar often (say, twice or three times a day, to play different songs) then you are going to wear out your strings FAST - you might even find that when trying some tunings, you need to get thicker strings, and replace the strings leaving more / less slack when you put the strings on to avoid breaking the strings while tuning.

Generally, if you are going for a lower tuning (such as drop C, where each string is 2 whole steps lower than regular tuning) then you need to leave LESS slack when putting on the strings, so that the strings are not loose when not wound up as much as normal.

If you are going for higher tunings than normal, you need to leave quite a bit MORE slack, otherwise you'll snap that string before you reach the higher note you require.

Hope that's all of use :)

Pete

ETD - Formerly "10141748 - Reincarnate"


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(@iliketheguitar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 124
Topic starter  

thanks u guys

and also i was wondering how to make the 3rd bridge effect with a screwdriver...looked on the web, but couldnt find anything useful


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(@dl0571)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 240
 

thanks u guys

and also i was wondering how to make the 3rd bridge effect with a screwdriver...looked on the web, but couldnt find anything useful

Google + Wikipedia = answers: The 3rd bridge guitar is an electric prepared guitar with an additional 3rd bridge. This can be a normal guitar with for instance a screwdriver placed under the strings,

I guess just shove a screwdriver under the strings where you want this bridge to be, though it seems to me it's the poor man's capo that has the potential to damage your instrument. Correct me if I'm wrong, though.

"How could you possibly be scared of being bad? Once you get past that, it's all beautiful." -Trey Anastasio


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(@iliketheguitar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 124
Topic starter  

that doesnt work ive tried it

i think that theres more to it


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(@dl0571)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 240
 

Well, really, what is the difference between this technique and just using a capo? I've never heard of the 3rd bridge effect before. Enlighten me.

"How could you possibly be scared of being bad? Once you get past that, it's all beautiful." -Trey Anastasio


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(@iliketheguitar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 124
Topic starter  

ehhh okay

simply put, a third bridge makes the string vibrate as two or more wave units *see diagram* and these extra wave units create harmonic overtones when notes are played


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(@dl0571)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 240
 

Ok, first off, Im sorry if I sounded like a jack...well, you know.

That said, I did a little research about 3rd bridges and what it was supposed to sound like so I grabbed my guitar and a screwdriver and tried it out. I stuck the screwdriver under the strings at the 7th fret (easy harmonic node) and played behind the "bridge" (between screwdriver and the nut). I had to jack up the volume on the guitar from 4 to 8 to hear it clearly but I was getting some bell like harmonic notes. Sounded like a mix of a pitch shifter and tremolo. Odd.

Don't think I'd ever actually use it in my playing but if that's the sound you're going for, work on getting it right. I would just think there'd be an easier way that wouldn't possibly hurt your guitar.

"How could you possibly be scared of being bad? Once you get past that, it's all beautiful." -Trey Anastasio


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(@iliketheguitar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 124
Topic starter  

ok thanks for the help

edit: didnt want to duble post so... I put two pencils under the strings of my guitar under two different frets (the 5th and 21st i think)
this allowed to pick where i usually do over the pickups instead of over the neck. Next I detuned each of my strings until they made a pretty strong harmonic.

pretty cool


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