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Keeping a band together


(@blutic1)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 280
Topic starter  

I've been in several "bands" although only two actually made it out of the garage. It seems like just as we are about to book our first gig, someone quits, stops knowing their parts, or can't make it to practice; and the whole project derails. People say they are committed when you ask them but then don't show up or learn their parts. Most people seem to like the idea of being in a band but don't want to do the work. Any suggestions?


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(@scrybe)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2246
 

Whips. And chains.

Sorry, that wasn't very helpful. Look for committed people. I tend to be able to read if people are good on their word nowadays, having had some similar experiences to you. And don't put all your eggs in one basket; if projects keep failing, why not have more than one on the go at any time? If it's nerves that are making people bail, start with some small and intimate/relaxed gigs and take it from there, and offer support to the nervous ones.

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


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(@ph0nage)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 207
 

well...I have found a great way (i think).

-I'm a software developer
-the other guitarist is a mechanical engineer
-the bassist is a software developer
-the drummer is Search Engine Marketing manager
These are generally analytical people (although perhaps lacking social skills occasionally?)

the only person that's given us some problems has been our vocalist. I've found that being selective of personalities could help. The rest of the band is made of analytical people that's used to having projects and accomplishing them. They also all have families in the area. We set an objective for the following week and meet it.

Perhaps having like minded people helps. Granted, everyone you meet (as I've found) says they'll practice and do whatever the band needs.

I just thought it was interesting that the computer people and engineers in my band have very solid.


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(@notes_norton)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1497
 

The only bands I've ever been in that stayed together were ones that gigged regularly.

When and if the work dries up, the musicians go elsewhere (myself included).

BTW, when assembling a band, I look for personality to be as important as musicianship. A killer musician with a chip on his/her shoulder or an ego problem will not be in my band. Playing music has to be fun for the musicians and the band. That's why they call it PLAYING music.

Insights and incites by Notes

Bob "Notes" Norton

Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com Add-on Styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft SongSmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<


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(@moonrider)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1309
 

The only bands I've ever been in that stayed together were ones that gigged regularly.

When and if the work dries up, the musicians go elsewhere (myself included).

Bingo. Notes has it right on the money. Practice is fun, but the performance is the high. Making a bit of cash doesn't hurt either.

Playing guitar and never playing for others is like studying medicine and never working in a clinic.

Moondawgs on Reverbnation


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

i don't have a ton of experience with this, but it seems like talented musicians are more likely to stick around than relative beginners, simply because they've already showed that they're willing to put in the effort to learn their instruments and are ready to play out. also, friends are more likely to stick together than strangers, but with the risk of losing the friendship if things go sour. regular gigs and profit is also a big incentive.


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(@notes_norton)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1497
 

The only bands I've ever been in that stayed together were ones that gigged regularly.

When and if the work dries up, the musicians go elsewhere (myself included).

Bingo. Notes has it right on the money. Practice is fun, but the performance is the high. Making a bit of cash doesn't hurt either.

Yes you need the cash to live on, but you need the audience for your soul. And without the soul, the gig gets stale.

Notes

Bob "Notes" Norton

Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com Add-on Styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft SongSmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<


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(@blueline)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1705
 

Good advice from everyone. Having been in several bands myself, I would mention that managing the personalities is probably one of the toughest tasks. You have to work at each relationship. When the others are not as commited as you, you need to move on quickly. phonage is correct, you have to find like minded people.

Teamwork- A few harmless flakes working together can unleash an avalanche of destruction.


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

Never been in a band myself. I've been at that tentative stage a few times - "that went OK, maybe we could get a band together?" - but as soon as I mention doing original songs as well as covers, there's a marked lack of enthusiasm....and I don't have the kind of forceful personality to lead a band.

I'm beginning to think it's an impossible ask - I'd have to find four or five like-minded people who are into the same kind of classic rock/pop/blues, grew up listening to the same music, were influenced by the same bands, and would enjoy playing somewhat derivative rock/pop music and not mind being told pretty much exactly what to play even if they were far better musicians than me....and I'd be too intimidated by their musicianship to tell them exactly what to play. Tough one, eh?

I'll follow this thread with interest.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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 Cat
(@cat)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1225
 

Dedication comes first...and talent, second.

No kiddin'!

Cat

"Feel what you play...play what you feel!"


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 cnev
(@cnev)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

Vic,

You can get a band going that's not a problem but you may need to loosen up on your expectations a bit. If you need to meet every criteria you listed without compromise then yea it'll be tough, but if you're willing to go with the flow and play different music etc., you can find like minded people to start a band.

As for the original stuff I'd hold that back till the band was somewhat organized and you've got a bit of a comfort zone with everyone then you could start breaking out the originals.

Personally if someone came to the band and right off the bat they started talking about originals they wanted to play I'd be a little wary that they might have an ego problem.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@clideguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 376
 

phonage is correct, you have to find like minded people.

Phonage (and his group) is a completely different "computer person" than this one.

I've been called at 2am, 3am, weekdays, weekends to solve computer problems for the customer. Any outage I have to take is on Friday, Saturday or Sunday with little or no notice, meaning any schedule I may have had has been blown out the window?

When the customer "ASKS" (that means I have to do it or find someone else)for assitance with a special project that occurs over the weekend, there we go, whatever I was planning is gone!

I'm supposed to be in a band? Have a practice schedule?

Different people, different situations - deal with it!
Bob Jessie


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