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(@asasmith)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

so im getting ready to start taking lessons and i was wondering if anyone has any advice, or what to expect, or what not to expect from the lessons or the teacher. (do you tip the teacher??) im nervous but excited at the same time. im just ready to really focus on the things that i need to do better with the guidance of someone who knows.

"its supposed to be pickin and grinnin. NOT pickin and scowlin"
-the feez


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(@tonycrf)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 15
 

I have never tipped my music teacher, except for a Xmas or birthday tip or something.

Teachers, like anything else, vary significantly. I've heard a lot of stories of teachers who take an approach that I personally don't like. I would say to be very critical and if you don't like your teacher, make sure to switch. You're paying good money for lessons and should make sure you're taking them with someone who fits your style and goals well.


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(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 833
 

Yeah, every teacher will be different. It will take a little bit of time to be sure that you and they will "click" and be able to work together. It may be obvious really soon but it may take a few lessons.

How that partnership will work will depend on what you want to get from it. If they're a good teacher they should listen to your goals and then be able to help you get there. Some of those things that it will take to get to your goals are likely to be things you don't know that you need. So be open to suggestions.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


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(@fretsource)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 974
 

Tip your teacher? After each lesson? What a great idea :D - I'll start dropping hints to my students - you never know, it might catch on like with hairdressers, waiters, taxi drivers, etc.
Otherwise, nothing to add to the good advice given in the posts above. Good luck


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(@akflyingv)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 407
 

Your first lesson or two will mainly be the teacher trying to figure how far along you are with the basics and then covering the basics. There are some great teachers on here that know way more about it then me so:

Good Luck, Have Fun, and Hope all goes well!


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(@xylembassguitar)
Trusted Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 66
 

Above all else, try to find a teacher that makes you excited about learning the guitar!

Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars


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(@aleholder)
Trusted Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 52
 

Hmmm. Interesting question. In my case, my teacher helps me stay focused, gives me feedback on technique, keeps me on the path. He also provides recommendations on how to proceed on the different genres I've studies. I've done an acoustic method book, blues you can use method book and now I'm on a jazz book. It takes me about a year to go through a book. I'm in no hurry.

With all that though, I don't progress though if I don't put the time into it. I also progress in fits and starts. Sometimes I'll go for a while and not progress, then out of the blue advance quite a bit.

I've also had some teachers that helped me better than others. Teaching is a skill as much as being a musician.

I don't tip my teacher. He charges me enough.


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(@ron-d)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 14
 

Do NOT tip the teacher! (sorry to the other teachers out there but, we're well paid as it is.)
As a teacher of 25+ years, my advice to you is question EVERYTHING you don't understand! Don't take somebody's opinion as "Gospel".
Don't stay with a teacher who tries to make you play like him/her.
A good teacher is there to supply you with the tools you need to become whatever level of musician you want to be.
My experience is that every student has different needs. Make sure your teacher is experienced and flexible enough to adapt to yours.
If you practice well, you will succeed. If you don't practice, don't blame the teacher.
Above all, work hard and have FUN!
Cheers,


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(@asasmith)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

i knew the tipping question would get everyones attention thanks for the advice everyone, im just nervous i guess.

"its supposed to be pickin and grinnin. NOT pickin and scowlin"
-the feez


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(@rum-runner)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 424
 

I never tipped my teacher, guitar or voice, nor do I know of anyone who has.

On another note, I'd suggest you ash any prospective teacher some questions about thier style before you sign up.
Figure out what your goals are, and is he'she capable of helping you get there. I had a very good teacher in terms of covering technique, but my probelm was that although he was real good, say,helpoing you work through the exercises in a book, or how to play scales, he fell short on being able to show me how to apply them. So I would up with a toolbox full of tools but didn't know how to use them. So, there the toolbox sits. Haven't figured out how to resolve that particular dilemma.

Anyhow, the moral is, make sure your teacher can offer the right balance of technique and practical application.

Regards,

Mike

"Growing Older But Not UP!"


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(@noteboat)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

I never tipped my teacher, guitar or voice, nor do I know of anyone who has.

It's not unheard of. At our school, I'd guess one lesson in 1,000 results in a tip for the teacher. So it's far from the norm, but I've seen it happen several times.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@rum-runner)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 424
 

And I'm sure that a little something extra at Christmastime wouldn't be unheard of, either.

Regards,

Mike

"Growing Older But Not UP!"


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(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1885
 

And I'm sure that a little something extra at Christmastime wouldn't be unheard of, either.

That I've seen at the school where my kids take piano.

I've observed that the older guitar students down the hall, tend to give their guitar teachers bottle shaped presents at Christmas...

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


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(@the-dali)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1507
 

Make sure the teacher knows what you want to get out of the lessons. I had an instructor who was ga-ga about acoustic guitars. I am an eletcric guy. We didn't mesh. I kept trying to bring in music for the Dead or early Who just to keep HIM interested. Wrong move.

-=- Steve

"If the moon were made of ribs, would you eat it?"


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(@cheesehead54)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 37
 

I sat with three teachers before I new I had the right one. One played country, one played religious and the last one played all 60's music. I like all of the music, but I didn't want to concentrate on any of those styles. If i wouldn't have asked the last one if he new any music newer than the 60's I wouldn't have him for a teacher now.Remember that you are paying them. It is not wrong to ask what direction they want to take you. I found it was easier to ask questions when I thought of it as they were auditioning for me. I played for him and then named three or four songs I wanted be able to play in a reasonable amount of time. He told me how much I would need to practice and he was right on.
Anyway, I think it is important to connect with the teacher. If you find the right teacher you can't wait for you next lesson and to see what they will have you learn next.
Only tip at x-mas.


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