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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

slapping and popping aren't just bass techniques. try them on guitar.

Can you elaborate?

Slapping and popping don't mean nothing to me English is not my first language as I said many times
Slapping is when the bass players use their thumb as a hammer against the strings. It is used a lot in some styles, for example, funk.

Gnease or other bass player will explain the "popping" :D

"Popping" is when you hook your finger (picking hand) on a string and "pick" it by pulling it away from the guitar and letting go. Gives the note a "popping" attack on the initial strike. Combining slapping and popping takes a little bit of practice, getting the thumb to do the slap and a finger to do the pop.

As gnease mentions, guitarists use these techniques as well as bass players.

Hope this helps.

Peace

Thanks for following up, guys -- I've been on biz travel.

-=tension & release=-


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(@mrjonesey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 470
 

Here ya go...just do this.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35pyz4Wm3ww

"There won't be any money. But when you die, on your death bed, you will receive total conciousness. So, I got that going for me. Which is nice." - Bill Murray, Caddyshack ~~ Michigan Music Dojo - http://michiganmusicdojo.com ~~


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(@clau20)
Reputable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 351
Topic starter  

Here ya go...just do this.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35pyz4Wm3ww

NICE

I understand what you mean by popping now.

But I still can't figure out how to do it

Thanks for all the other trick suggestion

" First time I heard the music
I thought it was my own
I could feel it in my heartbeat
I could feel it in my bones
... Blame it on the love of Rock'n'Roll! "


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(@viper)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
 

When I tap and I want to punctuate a musical idea, I usually use my tapping finger on my right hand to create strong vibrato. if done on a string surrounded by other strings, it touches the surrounding strings, giving a little bit of noise and more expression to the note.

Ibanez RG3EXFM1


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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3711
 

I don't think I have any tricks? Immagine that. :? I think everything I do in that catagory is borrowed / stolen from some place else. I suppose I know a bunch of other peoples tricks though. 8)

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

I understand what you mean by popping now.

But I still can't figure out how to do it
Pull up a string, and let it go! Pow!

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2268
 

If it went pow it would be called powing

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

Then it should be called "Whapping."

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2268
 

Nahh, if goes whap you're doing it wrong ;) Parping maybe, although I believe the playground has already laid claim that particular expression...

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


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(@maliciant)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 259
 

Tom Morello has his pickup switch setup so it doesn't feed anything on a setting, which is where a lot of the sound from rage against the machine comes from, I saw a video on youtube where he explained it once.

It takes a while to get good at slap/pop, and it's harder on a guitar (probably more so for electric than an accoustic guitar). Of course it's not too hard to slap/pop on the E strings and it sounds good. On my bass I like to do a thumb over the neck bit of slap pop because it's very easy to play minor thirds (same frets) or major thirds like that and can reach over for other important notes like that, been working on smooth transitioning from that 'handle' grip to the usual grip.

I've done the pushing the string over the edge of the of the neck on bass and guitar... on guitar I tended to do that a lot on the little e doing a bend (to this day I don't bend up much, almost always down...), on bass I tend to do the same thing a lot on the big E string, makes an awful sound if you are expecting something else (graphite neck so it doesn't muffle). It does make a distinct sound though, I haven't figured out a way to make that useful but I'm a struggling musician (not struggling to make money, I have a day job, just struggling to become a musician).

I'm a huge fan of mute strumming, you can get a lot of dynamic sounds going out of that depending on how, how much and where you mute the strings.

For uniqueness you can bend multiple strings, but bend them to differing degrees, finding the intervals that works best with and are reasonable to finger could be hard.

When it comes to technique, you probably won't come up with some technique that no one else has ever thought of, but by mastering the various techniques of other instruments you can transfer them into your playing fairly easily.


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(@classico)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 65
 

i love using Overtones on solos, you should definatly give it a try 8)

there are a few ways to get an overtone but the basic form is to just gently touch the 12th, 7th, or 5th fret with a left handed finger (preferably pinky) and pluck it with your right hand then quickly let go of the left finger and let it ring.

i love using it to give a new color on a solo and let it ring for a phrase cause you can just pluck it and forget about it, it rings on :D

if you didn't understand i'm positive someone can explain it more clearly then me, good luck


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(@viper)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
 

I smack the body of my guitar with high gain and with a repeadting effect. sounds really nice if you're into the whole metal thing since it gives a bit of a dark ambience. Probably would be better with a loop pedal, but I don't have one.
Another thing: Sometimes you can pick behind the bridge or over the nut for some cool noises. And pushing the strings behind the nut down works for gibsons without trem bars to get an extra vibrato or, with prebending, a divebomb. Plus, it's practically the only way to play the beginning to Iron Man without detuning the low e string.
One thing I like to do is play two notes, then hold them, and then bend the higher note. This gives a rather nice effect if they're relatively close to eachother. Try and bend them so they're close to unison or a perfect interval, but not quite perfect, for a little "beating" effect. One example is this is the wolf fifth, which is about 2/5ths of a semitone above a perfect fifth. (Yay for wikipedia!)

Ibanez RG3EXFM1


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

One example is this is the wolf fifth, which is about 2/5ths of a semitone above a perfect fifth. (Yay for wikipedia!)

And how exactly would I use this in a song?


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(@viper)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
 

anywhere where you want a tiny bit of dissonance. Like your typical rrock song. It uses just a bunch of fifth chord, which gets boring.
Substitute some of them with tritones and wolf fifths.
It may be a bit too dissonant for most though.

Ibanez RG3EXFM1


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

Hmm. I'm kinda slow in the head, do you know of a song where there are wolf fifths thrown in so I can listen to how it sounds? Or can you record a quick little clip?


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