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(@viper)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_fifth
Just use the applet on the page.
Or tune the A string a half a semitone high and do some power chords without the octave.

Ibanez RG3EXFM1


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(@maliciant)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 259
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_fifth
Just use the applet on the page.
Or tune the A string a half a semitone high and do some power chords without the octave.

Wouldn't it just be easier to play something like

- - -
- - -
- - -
- - 8
6 8 5
3 5 -

No foolin with the tuning etc, or am I misunderstanding what you said?


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(@clau20)
Reputable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 351
Topic starter  

Thanks for all the replies! 3 pages of tricks, NICE

But before being able to play all that stuff, I'll have to take English Guitar Vocabulary lesson, because I didn't understand the majority of complex technique description you gave me...

" First time I heard the music
I thought it was my own
I could feel it in my heartbeat
I could feel it in my bones
... Blame it on the love of Rock'n'Roll! "


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

Viper: I know what a wolf fifth is, I know how to get it, I just dont know why I should. I dont know any example of it, I can't make anything musical with it, and up until now I'd never heared anyone suggest it.

Maliciant: that's just an augmented fifth interval. A wolf interval is the result of tuning in such a way that some intervals are quite a bit off, depending on the key you're in. The whole point of Well Temperament tuning is that we dont have those wolf intervals, so we can play in every key we want. if anyone knows any musical example of this, please let me know!


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(@maliciant)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 259
 

I was just pointing out that the description of how to get it didn't seem right... but now that I re-read it (apparently less tired) I see how I made the mistake, I read half semitone and just thought semitone, which didn't match the description given earlier.


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

That's one of several true integer-ratio harmonics that don't fall on the Western scale. Look to Indian and Persian music for examples of their use. They have several quarter-tone frets on stringed instruments. Another of these, which I use all the time in blues, is the "blues third" that's just about halfway between the minor and major thirds. You probably use it too, whether you know it or not. (Bend a minor third up a quarter tone.) Singers use it a lot. And of course, slide players.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

I usually do not like tapping, I think it is way overdone, but here is a trick I learned from Hendrix. You bend a note raising the pitch a whole note and applying a wide vibrato. Then with a finger on the picking hand (I use my middle finger) you tap on the string higher up the fretboard. There are lots of good spots you can do this. But you do not tap and remove your tapping finger, you leave your tapping finger on the note. At the same time you continue your wide vibrato on the original note you bent. So now you will get this higher tapped note with vibrato. You can hold this note a long time if you keep the vibrato going. Then lift your tapping finger, at the same time allowing the bent note to release or return to normal pitch, then you continue your vibrato.

Sorry for the long explanation, but this is a pretty difficult trick and takes lots of practice. But it is worth it, it is a fantastic effect if performed well.


~~~~~~T~~~~~~r~~~~~~
e----------------------------
b----------------------------
g------7^-----12-----7-------
d----------------------------
a----------------------------
e----------------------------

T= tap on note with picking hand finger
r= release- allow string to return to original pitch

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 840
 

^^Thanks for the explanation, Wes. You actually see him doing that somewhere in this vid-
http://youtube.com/watch?v=smwaJqZZs9U

You can see him doing at a little after 3:20. He's hammering on and off with the freting hand and with the picking hand is tapping a higher note. Simply incredible...so ahead of his time, and people say Van Halen invented tapping!


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

Kevin

Thanks for the rare video, I've never seen that one before. I think it is pretty safe to assume the person who took that video did not go on to become a professional photographer or film maker.

I am trying to remember a song where this particular trick was performed. I believe the very last note in Are You Experienced is this technique, but that solo was played backwards, so it's hard to know. He didn't do this trick often, but when he did it was fantastic.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 8308
 

at 3:20, he's just muting the strings while he plays one handed.


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