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What guage strings do you use? (i.e. 9, 10, etc)

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PRNDL
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I'm wondering what other people choose for string guage - acoustic and electric.

Some say that thicker strings improve tone, but they can make your fingers hurt (unless you've got strong fingers and tough tips).
Very thin strings can feel too flimsy for some.
Thick strings on an electric can pull a floating bridge way up.

I'm also wondering if people choose strings based on tension ... is there a thick string with low tension?
Does string tension affect the feel, tone and playability?

I tend to use 10's on the acoustic and 9's on the electric, which is "extra light" according to the labels.

What guage strings do you use, and why?

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gnease
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I'm wondering what other people choose for string guage - acoustic and electric.

Some say that thicker strings improve tone, but they can make your fingers hurt (unless you've got strong fingers and tough tips).
Very thin strings can feel too flimsy for some.
Thick strings on an electric can pull a floating bridge way up.

Not correct -- It's true that heavier strings must be under higher tension to tune to pitch as compared to lighter strings, but floating trem systems are adjustable to correct for this. One is supposed to adjust the trem's spring tension to compensate the additional tension from the strings.
I'm also wondering if people choose strings based on tension ... is there a thick string with low tension?
Does string tension affect the feel, tone and playability?

As a typical design goal, the luthier/designer will try to make the tension across strings uniform. This helps make the feel uniform across strings. In order to accomplish this, the strings' masses/length are adjusted by thickness, choice of material, addition of windings and/or use of composite constructions. Generally: Thick string=> more mass/unit length => higher tension for same tuning. Only a thicker string with lower density would allow lower tension. The obvious example of this is a nylon string. Unfortunately, this is not everyone's cup-o-tea. There are other formulations of strings, such as silk and steel that are easier to play. Again not everyone likes these. You will have to try these for yourself.
I tend to use 10's on the acoustic and 9's on the electric, which is "extra light" according to the labels.

What guage strings do you use, and why?

I have fairly strong, toughened fingers, so generally choose string types and gauges first for tone and second for feel. On the feel: I actually prefer a guitar that provides some "resistance" or "fight," so somewhat thicker gauge/higher tension is better for me. This is also the reason I prefer the longer Fender scale over the Gibson scale -- Fender guitars require more tension to tune to the same note given the same guage strings.

Here's what I use:

Acoustic 6: 13s (mediums)
Acoustic 12: 11s (for the sake of the guitar)
Fender scale electric (25.5 in): 10s or 11s
Gibson scale electric (24.75 in): 11s +

-=tension & release=-


   
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thectrain
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On my electric when I started I played with 9s. But quickly went to 10s because I broke too many 9s bending(I 've always had strong hands). But I was too green to notice a tonal difference. Then in my quest for better tone I recently went to 11s, I didn't find them too hard to play but my fingers get pretty raw after alot of bending. I tried 12s but there was way too much tension even tuned down, plus it was pretty hard to handle. So I settled for 11s perfect balance of feel and tone. Acoustic I actually use 11 sometimes but mostly 12s.


   
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Misanthrope
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10-52 tuned down 1/2 step, the older the better :)

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Zacharias
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12 :)

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Tommy Guns
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I use 10's now. But since we tune down 1/2 step I'm thinking I will change to 11's.

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ArtGuitarHendsbee
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12's on the K Yari acoustic
13's On the Electric


   
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97reb
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I use 9-46's and 10-52's, kind of hybrid sets. I think the 10-52's are good for regular and a half step down. I may try a 10 or 11 thru 56 for D tuning. If I go to C tuning, I'll probably get 12 or 13-60. I'm not too worried about using thicker guage strings, since I play bass, also. I'm used to thick strings now.

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Misanthrope
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I use 9-46's and 10-52's, kind of hybrid sets. I think the 10-52's are good for regular and a half step down. I may try a 10 or 11 thru 56 for D tuning. If I go to C tuning, I'll probably get 12 or 13-60. I'm not too worried about using thicker guage strings, since I play bass, also. I'm used to thick strings now.How much difference is there between 9-46s and 10-52s? I use 10-52s at the moment, but I'm thinking of restringing one of my guitars to be a bit lighter (I'm starting to get widdlier, yay!) - but I'm worried about losing too much of the tone I love.

(I'm going to do it anyway - no substitute for actually trying it yourself and all that - just thought I'd ask your opinion as you use both :))

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banre
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Standard 10s on both electrics.

On acoustic, I use a 12-56 set of "bluegrass" strings from webstrings. I really like these, it fills out the bottom end on my guitar.

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havocdragon
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I use 13s on both elec and acoustic :D

Its fun when I go to the guitar store, because on 9s I am a god at bending now lol.

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angryelephant3
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9s :shock:


   
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Dagwood
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I use:

11's on my Les Paul
10's on my Strat and '51

and "LIGHTS" on my Accoustics.

I like the D'Adds on my Accoustics and Ernie's Slink's on my electrics.

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Dustdevil
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Recently, GHS True Mediums on my Seagull. (A hybrid between lights and med's.) I tune down a lot to DADGAD and "Eb" (normal tuning a half-step down). Keeps the tension up a bit.

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U2Bono269
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10s & 11s on electric

12s on acoustic

i have a setof 13s laying around that i might pop on my Squier '51 for kicks

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