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(@ph0nage)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 207
Topic starter  

Looks like i'm going to be playing in a band at my friend's church. That's better than what I was hoping for - only playing 2 months.

Question for you all...

Being the only guitarist, I'll probably end up playing chords most of the time. Is it considered "ok" for an electric guitar to just be strumming? Or should I pull out my beatup acoustic?


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 Bish
(@bish)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3765
 

Use whatever you are comfortable with.

I played guitar in church and since I'm not that good, did most of the rhythm along with an acoustic player. We had a smokin' lead guitarist so I just did fill in and backing rhythms.

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

of course it is fine to play an electric in that way. you could arrpegiate to add interest instead of a full on lead solo.
strum the rhythm and pick out the melody whist holding a barre is mose excellent sounding.
that could be a bi t hard for a two monther. but since you're in a band , well, you gotta try.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@dommy09)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 74
 

Being the only guitarist, I'll probably end up playing chords most of the time. Is it considered "ok" for an electric guitar to just be strumming? Or should I pull out my beatup acoustic?

Malcolm Young (AC/DC) has been doing it for 34 years! 8)

"We all have always shared a common belief that music is meant to be played as loud as possible, really raw and raunchy, and I'll punch out anyone who doesn't like it the way I do." -Bon Scott


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(@rob77)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 137
 

I agree with the others -electric guitars are as good for rythm as any other type. Play the guitar that you're most comfortable /familiar with & that will help with any nerves, too. 8)

"Who says you can't 'dive bomb' a bigsby?!"


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(@mahal)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 108
 

Bring both and let the Praise Leader decide.


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(@dan-t)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5072
 

Bring both and let the Praise Leader decide.

+1

And leave the Marshall stack at home! :)

Actually, I used to play an electric at my church. Used a small amp & a chorus pedal. You want to blend in with the other intrsuments as much as possible, but still be heard. Good luck.

Dan

"The only way I know that guarantees no mistakes is not to play and that's simply not an option". David Hodge


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

you easily could use either, i would consider the ensemble i was playing with.

If there is no drummer, which i imagine there may not be at church, acoustics have a much more open and percussive sound. Provided your rythms are strong you can really drive the pieces forward whilst playing the chords as well. thats why most duos use acoustics, they provide stronger rhythmic backing, as well as being more harmonically interesting.

If there is a drummer, or if some kind of percussion is present (eg. tamborine etc) it really won't matter. with an electric you can create a much purer, more heavenly tone which may be favorable in that forum. Provided you keep the tone warm and clean it should be fine.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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