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Guitar Static problem


(@allunderstood)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

I have a 10 year old epiphone les paul, everything works fine until lately I have been getting static whenever I move or the cord hits something. I figured it was a loose output jack or wiring. So I unscrewed the jack from the body of the guitar. Everything looked fine. Then with the jack outside of the body, I plugged in to test and everything sounds good. I can move around and move the cable around and no static or noises. But once I put the output jack back into the body of the guitar same thing again, any movement I get noise.

Hoping someone who knows more then me might have an idea whats going on here. Thanks in advance.


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

static is quite typical during the winter months when the room humidity drops. I can hear clicking or subtle popping sounds when I play my strat AND when my finger nails brush the plastic pick guard as I strum. when I purposely do not brush the pick guard there is no noise.
I suspect what you have is dryness. when you remove a sweater by pulling it over your head does it make that sound? if so, then you need to humidify your room.
if on the other hand you have electrical shorting pop sounds, then it is a process of elimination. I always start with the guitar cord, then the guitar jack.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@roundi)
Trusted Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 98
 

Must be the time of year? I have been dealing with this as well. I sprayed some static guard on a rag an rubbed it on the pickguard and put a humidifier in the room and the popping has not returned in a week. I also shielded my guitar including the pickguard which is supposed to help.

The quick and easy fix is using bounce sheets or static guard. Adding humidity helps too. I have a Tele though with a big flat pickguard. I am not so sure about the LP style.

Good luck


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(@allunderstood)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Thanks guys I'll try those ideas. But I guess I used the wrong word, I said its been a problem lately, but really its been about 6 months now, including the humid months when my house does gets very humid.

I know its not the cable or Amp, tried the guitar at a friends house on there equipment and it still had the same problem. And like I said, it only happens when I have the output jack screwed into the body of the guitar, not when its hanging out unscrewed. But still, it wouldn't surprise me if it is a dryness problem, so like I said, I'll try both of your suggestions. Thanks


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

thanks for the further information. I think your problem is indeed with the output jack.
ground (earth) issue, loose solder connection, wrong wire to wrong terminal are the main culprits.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@staffan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 125
 

I have the same problems with static noises as Dogbite described, when my fingers scratch the plastic pickguard. I live in Sweden and the winter months tend to give really dry air.

I was wondering about air-humidifiers - what can you use? I´m sure there are both "professional" stuff as well as maybe more "household" stuff you could use?! I would appreciate any suggestions (both professional and household) cause I think I should start to use something during the winter months - to save stress on my guitars.

Thank you in advance!

AAAFNRAA
- Electric Don Quixote -


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

I use one of those ultra sonic humidifiers. it is the type that creates that white looking mist. there are many models and sizes o suit ones needs. the downside, if you have high mineral content in your water supply ( I do since we use wells) you will eventually see a white dusty coating on your shelves and TV screen.
there are other types that 'boils' the water and others that simply evaporate water.
all to a degree work. I like the sonic misters. effect and I don't mind the dust. I could use distilled water.

if you have radiant heat sources, like radiators or wood stoves, place a wide container of water on the heating surface.

I had at one time used one of those in case humidifiers until it leaked.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@staffan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 125
 

Thanks Dogbite - I appreciate it!

AAAFNRAA
- Electric Don Quixote -


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(@takenotes)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 1
 

Searching for an answer, I found this forum.

Maybe this is my problem as well? I posted a brief YOU-TUBE example of the popping noises. Find it here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el4CGt1Rj0Y

My place is a little bit dry (40% humidity), but very typical for a Minnesota winter. There has to be a better solution to solve this other than pump up the humidity. (I already have a humidifier.) Any ideas? Could I add some kind of shielding?

Thanks.


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

I believe you have a static problem due to dryness. what you show is very typical.
one idea. your pickups could be microphonic for some reason. the pickups act like a microphone and amplify any sound near them. unfortunately I have no remedy if that is the case.
I seriously doubt that is the problem.
I live in the north midwest. during the dead of winter in Minneapolis my guitar acted the same as yours. a room humidifier helps
in reducing the static. it may not go away until spring however. if so, keep your fingertips off the pickguard when strumming.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@notes_norton)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1497
 

There is a product you can get at Radio Shack and other electronic supply stores called ProGold (by a company called Caig). It leaves a thin film on the plug that enhances the connection.

If the plug is oxidized, Caig also has a product called DeOxit, use it first.

These two are my best defense against connection problems.

Insights and incites by Notes ♫

Bob "Notes" Norton

Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com Add-on Styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft SongSmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<


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