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Help with an uncomfortable Fender bridge

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(@97reb)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1196
Topic starter  

I have recently realized the bridge on my Fender Toronado is uncomfortable when I have the action lowered and try to play palm-muted rythyms. It is a 6 saddle string-thru hard tail bridge. When I lower the action on the guitar, the saddle adjusters stick up and poke into my hand. I really can't stand playing the guitar with those screws poking my hand and if I have the action set high enough where the screws don't bother me, then the action just sucks, especially compared to my Gibson's beautiful low and quite comfortable action.

So, any suggestions? Can I get shorter saddle screws and thus have lower action and not have the screws poking up? Maybe I have to replace the bridge, but that seems like it could be a pricey project. Get used to the discomfort? Don't think so, I'd just have to trade that little senorita in for something else. And no, I won't can't adjust my rythym playing to another style, palm-muted rythym and riffing is just so heavy-metal.

So appreciative of any advice my friends.

It is a small world for metal fanatics. I welcome you fellow musicians, especially the metalheads!


   
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(@u2bono269)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1167
 

maybe if you just put new saddles on it?

http://www.brianbetteridge.com


   
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(@97reb)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1196
Topic starter  

Well, maybe a different brand with shorter screws/adjusters, otherwise I don't see the point in replacing the saddles.

It is a small world for metal fanatics. I welcome you fellow musicians, especially the metalheads!


   
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(@slothrob)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 472
 

You can polish or grind the top of the adjuster screws with a dremmel tool, even a piece of emery cloth or a small file should be enough to round off the edges enough to make them comfortable. You might want to remove them one at a time so you don't mar the surface of the guitar or bridge nor lose your setup.
I've also noticed that the higher end Fenders have less sharp adjusting screws, especially the ones with the chrome plated screws, so you should be able to get them from your local Fender dealer. If none of this works for you, check Allparts and StewMac for better or shorter screws.
Don't trade a guitar you like because the screws are cheap, this should be easily remedied.


   
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(@97reb)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1196
Topic starter  

yeah, slothrob. That is some good advice. I need a Dremmel anyway. That's a damn good reason to get one. All the other advice was quite nice, and will be used right.

It is a small world for metal fanatics. I welcome you fellow musicians, especially the metalheads!


   
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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

If you're going to consider shortening screws, why not buy a new set and cut those down - keep the originals just in case you make a mistake..

Don't forget to shorten the plain end, i.e. what will support the saddle against the bridge - it's not easy to put a new notch in for the screwdriver.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
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