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Neck Crack repair


(@thespottedelf)
New Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

I found this forum through google and thought I'd ask a quick question about repairing the neck of a guitar.

The Guitar is a 2005 or 2006 Epiphone LP-100, my first electric. Because of my neck problem my parents took pitty on my problem and bought me an Epiphone Les Paul Classic and I'm in love <3

I have a crack in my neck between the nut and the first fret. And I'm looking to repair it, so I can use this as a second guitar, or sell it cheap to a friend.

My father suggested to pry it open and put some wood glue or epoxy in it, then put a couple brad nails in it, then use wood filler then sand it smooth. My fear of doing this method is damaging the fretboard in some way.

I was hoping maybe someone here has experience with neck cracks.

Thanks for any help :)


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

I'd be more likely to try fixing it by simply spreading the crack, infiltrating a low viscosity cyanoacrylate glue that will wick through it by capillary action, and clamping it back firmly in compression till it set.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@thespottedelf)
New Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

where could i find a "low viscosity cyanoacrylate glue"?


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

OTOH …

just did a similar repair on badly cracked Yamaha acoustic. have to admit, I was hesitant to pry the cracked area (kind of splintery elliptical crack on back of neck running from 2 cm below the nut the to 2 cm above, toward the tuners), but decided to do it anyway. I spread and wedged open the crack with toothpicks, then infused the exposed inner area with Tite Bond wood glue, removed the toothpick wedges, wiped up the considerable excess glue, clamped and wiped again. worked perfectly! sanded, re-lacquered and it's a go. while I appreciate Rico's advice to use Super Glue (cyanoacrylate) and avoid opening the crack, Super Glue just isn't as strong as Tite Bond Original (aliphatic resin, or "yellow" glue) for this application, and it is not as flexible. plus SG it a real mess. it can easily damage the guitar's finish. with the Tite Bond, I didn't need to worry about damaging the finish, as it cleans up with a damp rag.

BTW, if spreading the crack opens it further or breaks off the headstock, it's just a bigger glue job -- still repairable with equally good results. I'm glad I opened the crack and was sure I covered the entire fractured surface. I'm not sure SG would have wicked into the crack deeply enough anyway.

-=tension & release=-


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

True, Tite Bond is excellent stuff.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@thespottedelf)
New Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

I believe i'll try the superglue meathod first, then i'll try the wood glue if that doesn't work... I was looking at the crack and I don't know if it will open up far enough for wood glue.


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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

I believe i'll try the superglue meathod first, then i'll try the wood glue if that doesn't work... I was looking at the crack and I don't know if it will open up far enough for wood glue.
I would suggest that you use only one method - and I'd go for the Tite-bond.

Super glue, in my experience, never gives a satisfactory bond, where the pieces, that have been glued, are put under stress. If you do try super glue and, as I expect, it comes apart, you'll be left with wood that has a weak coating (the dried super glue), so that the tite bond won't have a bond to the wood, just to the super glue residue.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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