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new project guitar!! Old parlor sized..

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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 849
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Well its been a wile since I got around to working on the old girl. Since last I posted I saw that I realy needed to pull all the frets, and sand the board. It had a huge hump in it where the neck met the body. So I jumped in, and pulled all the frets, and then summer came...life got busy... and we all know the drill. :D So a new year came, we are here in the doldrums of winter, and the tools come out again. I started sanding the neck down. This one had a dead flat fretboard. I like a little radius so I decided to go with a 20" radius sanding block. Just enough to give it a slight curve. Rigging up some support for the neck, and steamed off the old [wooden!] nut, and went to it... At this point I am just about done with the rough sanding. Not only was there a big hump at the body joint, but there were also many dips and valleys all over the board. being this had vary little playing, Im assuming its just poor workmanship. I really like the feel of the slight curve it has now. I still need to sand where the tail of the fretboard falls off a little at the soundhole, then do the finish sanding. I picked up some bone nut blanks, and wile ive recut some nuts before, ill be trying my hand at cutting a new one from a blank. Ive also picked up some fret wire. The ones in it were vary small, and brass. The ones I got to replace are just a tiny bit bigger. They were listed for mandolins, and are just a tick bigger then the stock ones. They should fit this shorter scale neck well. All in all this has been a real fun project, and Ive learned a TON from it!!! I do very much enjoy working on guitars. So much that I picked up another project.. its a old Kay that needs a neck reset, and the bridge has been swapped to a classical bridge... Im planning on doing the neck, and swapping to a floating bridge, with tailpiece on it.

Heres my progress so far on the little parlor!

Paul B


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

Awesome! I missed this thread...

A silly question: why do you use the iron? For hotting the glue?


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 849
Topic starter  

Awesome! I missed this thread...

A silly question: why do you use the iron? For hotting the glue?

Not silly at all. Yes, the iron is for heating the glue to soften it so the pieces will come apart.

Paul B


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(@moreguitar65)
New Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1
 

something I've learned when dealing with removing frets from an old rosewood fretboard, if you heat up each fret with the tip of your soldering iron, it tends to activate the oils of the wood and frets come out smoother with less chips and fragments! hope your project turned out great those old parlors are so much fun!


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 849
Topic starter  

something I've learned when dealing with removing frets from an old rosewood fretboard, if you heat up each fret with the tip of your soldering iron, it tends to activate the oils of the wood and frets come out smoother with less chips and fragments! hope your project turned out great those old parlors are so much fun!
Well its kinda stalled the last ....oh what two years now!!! Lifes been crazy and most things have been on the back burner. I really got to get back to it.....

Paul B


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