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Nice Takamine ... with a nice crack !

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grishester
(@grishester)
New Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Hi guys,

First of all thanks a lot for the so valuable information available on this site.

Well, let's go straight to the point. I have bought a greatest guitar, a Takamine TAN60CLH with a huge offer -60% on the price. It's new.

Hooowever here is the trap and the reason why it was so cheap. There is a big crack on the table. I was told by the shopkeeper that I had to stick it with Titebond and then to tighten with a clamp.

I have no experience at all in guitar reparation and would like to know :

  • If it is the right way to do it
    Any warning about it
  • I know I cannot have it brand new without going with a luthier but I don't really care of having it brand new. I love the sound and want to limit the crack expansion.

    Thanks a lot in advance.

    I send you the pictures :


       
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    Jayy
     Jayy
    (@jayy)
    Active Member
    Joined: 14 years ago
    Posts: 7
     

    It's a nice looking crack.
    This to me is quite a complex repair to do well if you don't have any experience. It's not essential that you use titebond you can use hide glue which tends to be more repair friendly. I would want to see more details of the damage like damage to the rib and what it's like from the inside. Looks like there's probably a strut running across the crack which has probably come unglued so it will have to be glued back after the crack is closed. Does it look like the crack has been open for a while and can you close it up fully with hand pressure?


       
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    gnease
    (@gnease)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 19 years ago
    Posts: 5038
     

    not sure there would be any bracing in a cutaway bout, as it's probably not necessary for strength in that area. if there is not, you will probably need to compress the bout with gentle clamping to close the crack and add a cleat or two on the inside to help solidify the repaired strength. here's a link about that:

    http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/crackrepair.htm

    unless there are complicating circumstances, such as critical fitment of pieces, I would probably do the structural repair (cleating, gluing) first and address the cosmetics (smaller edge pieces, binding) second. but make sure the initial gluing includes all pieces that need to be in place when the crack is closed by clamping.

    -=tension & release=-


       
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    grishester
    (@grishester)
    New Member
    Joined: 14 years ago
    Posts: 2
    Topic starter  

    Hi Thanks a lot.
    It's not essential that you use titebond you can use hide glue which tends to be more repair friendly.
    Would you have any examples of brands I can buy online ?
    Does it look like the crack has been open for a while and can you close it up fully with hand pressure?
    When I close it by the hand pressure there still is some crack. What does this mean?

    Thanks again.


       
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    gnease
    (@gnease)
    Illustrious Member
    Joined: 19 years ago
    Posts: 5038
     

    stew-mac.com sells a lot of glues. I believe Jayy is referring to the fact that hide glue can be "undone" with steaming. that might be a consideration if there is a brace, but for the top repair, I don't see that you will be doing any later repairs -- unlike braces, which may be removed and re-installed during other repairs. Tite Bond also will give you plenty of working time. not sure about the newer "in the bottle" formulations of hide glue, but suspect working and drying times are a similar to Tit Bond (anybody use these?).

    did you remove the broken material before squeezing? if not, that might be interfering. also make sure the guitar has been about 50% relative humidity for some time to make sure there is no shrinkage from lack of normal moisture. in any case, hand pressure probably won't be as effective as moderate (but careful) clamping. if there is still a gap with all bits removed and moderate clamping, then you may need to glue in a sliver of same-type top wood to fill the gap -- and you should cleat the repair for strength as I mentioned above.

    Nick (admin/moderator) will probably have some recommendations, as he does acoustic repairs.

    -=tension & release=-


       
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