Skip to content
QUESTION ABOUT MY S...
 
Notifications
Clear all

QUESTION ABOUT MY STRAT

8 Posts
7 Users
0 Reactions
2,877 Views
(@rotten)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 39
Topic starter  

I just bought a new Highway 1 Strat, and i have noticed i get this string buzz on my G string. Its like an extra ting after i hit it with a little ummpff. It was a floor model i bought from guitar center, and the G string does not appear to be stock superbullet. Is this normal for a new strat? It is made usa so it shouldnt be mechanics. And i know its not the pickups/electronics(it happens with no amp).

So im thinking its the string, but i could be wrong for this is my first electric axe.

Any help or input is greatly appricated.

thanks in advance  

Dirty Rotten

"You gona bark all day little doggy? Or are you gona bite?"


   
Quote
(@forrok_star)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

I have a few Guitars that buzz and rattle when I play them without and Amp. I have been one for just leaving them be. When I have them plugged in you can't here the fret buzz. And they play and sound just fine.

Perhaps at the shop someone broke a string and they just replaced it with another one from a box of extra string laying around. it could very well be the case.

Why not play it for awhile then when you change strings see if it still does it.

joe


   
ReplyQuote
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Sounds like a bad set-up; maybe the shop set it up with Super Bullets and the odd string is not quite the same.
If so, a new Super Bullet would fix it.

Otherwise it could be a badly-cut nut slot if it only happens on the open string, or the action (saddle height or truss rod) needs adjusting.

On a new guitar the shop should sort this out for you.


   
ReplyQuote
(@acceptedone)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 27
 

I have a few Guitars that buzz and rattle when I play them without and Amp. I have been one for just leaving them be. When I have them plugged in you can't here the fret buzz. And they play and sound just fine.

Perhaps at the shop someone broke a string and they just replaced it with another one from a box of extra string laying around. it could very well be the case.

Why not play it for awhile then when you change strings see if it still does it.

joe

ive got an Epi Les Paul standard Goldtop that buzzes like crazy unplugged, the strings are ALMOST touching the fretboard the action is so low, but plugged  in there is zero buzz... i dig it, it's fast and has great tone (by buzzing like crazy i dont mean buzzing loudly, i just mean buzzing a bit all along the neck, but the intonation is good and it doesnt fret out at ALL, so it's all good) i love my les paul.


   
ReplyQuote
(@forrok_star)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

A couple of them that rattle are 30 year old gibsons, I have just left them as they are. You can't hear the fret buzz when their plugged into an amp. Like said they play and sound great.

joe


   
ReplyQuote
(@jstar)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 29
 

The first thing you should do for a good setup is put a fresh pack of strings on.  Since you'll need to do it anyway, (and by now, you've probably worn out the ones that came with the guitar), go ahead and spend the $5 and find out  if it's the guitar or the strings.  

If its still buzzes, then you can decide if it's something you can live with (it doesn't come throught the amp) or is something that requires a good setup to fix.  

Music is therapy. Music is celebration. Music is everywhere. Music is life!


   
ReplyQuote
(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
 

     Also, if you go up a string size, say from 9's that probably came on the guitar to 10's, you will:
    *increase the tension on the neck, slightly increasing the neck relief and giving the strings a bit more room to vibrate.
    *increase the tension on the strings, making them a little less "slinky".  This can make them less apt to touch the frets.
     This can be a quick and cheap way to improve the set-up (sort of) on a buzzing fretboard.  Going up one step shouldn't change your intonation much, but that's a really easy adjustment on a strat if it does.  Ask if you want some help with that.
      Hopefully you would then be happy with the feel of the new relief and string tension.  A lot of people prefer the sound of higher guage strings.  
     Sometimes just putting a fresh set of the same guage strings can help, as jstar already mentioed.


   
ReplyQuote
(@97reb)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1196
 

I don't know why I had 8's on my Toronado, but went up to 10's recently and really liked the way things were sounding.  Then I noticed the neck was curved inward because the way it was playing  and had to adjust the trussrod.  The strings are great now and the neck is straight again.  The action might need to be lowered a touch for my taste.  I am still trying to find the sweet spot for the Toronado.  My Gibson V just came set up sweet and I plan on keeping the same type and gauge strings for ever on that baby.

It is a small world for metal fanatics. I welcome you fellow musicians, especially the metalheads!


   
ReplyQuote