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Strat tailpiece replacement advice


(@oenyaw)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 396
Topic starter  

I am considering taking off the wang bar, replacing with a "straight" tailpiece.

Advice? suggestions? comments?

Brain-cleansing music for brain-numbing times in a brain dead world
http://www.oenyaw.com


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

Could just put in a wedge to block the trem. Lots less trouble, and it's reversible.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@citizennoir)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1248
 

Hi :D

Not sure that I understand what you mean by a 'straight' tailpiece?

Hardtail Strats have the same 6 holes thru body that a Tele has.
Once a vibato Strat....

What year is the Strat in question?
As the 'inertia block' , as it's called changed through the years.
Actually, it's a very important link in the chain to great tone via 'primary tone' characteristics.

I have an 88 Strat MIA, and the inertia block is thin, cheap potmetal I think.... not really to good at all.

I also have a 71 Strat with the first generation inertia block, and that guitar SINGS!
The resonance is phenomenal!!!!

If you'd really like to make a huge splash in the primary tone pool, I would suggest upgrading to a Callaham inertia block
and then following Ric's advice and have it blocked off with a nice chunk of hardwood

Ken

"The man who has begun to live more seriously within
begins to live more simply without"
-Ernest Hemingway

"A genuine individual is an outright nuisance in a factory"
-Orson Welles


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

now that I think about the problem a bit, I'm surprised no one sells something such as an oversized replacement interia block, that once installed, blocks the trem. of course there are various body routes and tolerance issues that will make this design impractical for a as a one-size-fits-all ... but maybe block with integral adjustment (screw adjustable expansion feature) would do this. Might even be adjustable from trem to no-trem. not really a difficult mechanical concept. (and it is a granted that it probably will muck up the tone from timbre-critical Ken's PoV )

-=tension & release=-


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(@citizennoir)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1248
 

Hey Greg :D
Thankx for the nod 8)

Yeah, my ear seems to be tuned in more to the timbral (is that a word? ) aspects of the guitar.

Although - I think you're really on-to something there!
My parents were up for T-Giving, and my dad and I discussed your idea for awhile today.

I must admit, that as I visualized it reading thru your post the first time that I sorta cringed at a
suspected loss of tonal character;
Tho, to be fair, ya never know.
It might actually be as good, if not better with a well thought adjustable set-up.

Anyway -
I forgot to mention that Callaham also makes a thicker bridge plate (out of SS if I'm not mistaken),
and vintage style saddles....
I mean, if you were going to replace the inertia block anyway
And then....
You might as well go all the way with it and have a bone nut installed (or as Mitch might suggest - Tusq),
as well as have the neck to body joint shimmed and blocked up by a luthier :D

Ken

"The man who has begun to live more seriously within
begins to live more simply without"
-Ernest Hemingway

"A genuine individual is an outright nuisance in a factory"
-Orson Welles


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(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3297
 

You might as well go all the way with it and have a bone nut installed (or as Mitch might suggest - Tusq),

Ah, but mainly because they come pre-slotted, making them DIY-friendly.

Otherwise, nuts is nuts.

Anyway, I'd look at the Tremol-No. Seems to be pretty functional, and about the same price as the Callaham trem block. Videos on their website:
http://www.tremolno.com/

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


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