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Tuners


(@nexion)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 536
Topic starter  

I bought an American Telecaster Deluxe recently and absolutely love it. The only downside is that the tuners are a little iffy. I remember I could go days without needing to tune up my Les Paul, but with my Tele I have to tune every time I pick it up. And sometimes if I really get into it I need to tune it every couple of hours.

So...I'm looking for some tighter tuners, any recommendations?

Are locking tuners a good solution? It seems like they would be a pain, having to unlock and then lock every time you wanted to make an adjustment.

Thanks.

P.S. I haven't logged in here in over a year, how's everyone doing?

"That’s what takes place when a song is written: You see something that isn’t there. Then you use your instrument to find it."
- John Frusciante


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(@ph0nage)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 207
 

I just bought some fender schaller deluxe locking tuners a little while back for my Highway 1 HSS strat. They popped in without any changes or drilling.

Changing strings is fast with them and then don't go out of tune as often because it's not wrapped around the tuning peg over and over

On these tuners, it's not referring to locking in that you need to lock and unlock to change tuning - but that it clamps on the string to hold it, rather than winding and winding


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 Cat
(@cat)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1225
 

Locking tuners are the biggest pain in the gluteous maximus I've ever come across. In fact, I leave them open on my Ibanez. Most quality tuners will work well enough but they do need to be serviced...especially if you live in the desert.

Cat

"Feel what you play...play what you feel!"


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(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 833
 

Locking tuners don't need to be unlocked to change or adjust tuning. They only need to be unlocked to change strings. You are thinking of locking nuts (and even these have micro-adjustment that doesn't require unlocking).

Locking tuners are great. They make string changing easier and they hold tune better. How? Because there is less string wrapped around the post and so less slack that needs tightened up. Also, the higher the gear ratio on the tuner generally means that it will be more stable. These will generally have tighter gear tolerances which means less gear lash which is part of the loss of tuning problem.

One thing you can do (if you don't now) is to always make sure to tune UP to a note and never DOWN. This ensures that all the gears are engaged to fight against string tension and so will prevent some detuning.

I've got a few different brands of locking tuners - Schaller, Grover, and Gotoh. The Schallers are nice though an older design. They are heavy (adds to head weight) and only 14:1. The Grovers are decent economy locking tuners and I have them on a beater.

The Gotohs are really nice. I have these on two electrics in reproduction "vintage" style though with newer sealed higher gear ratios. There is a very high gear ratio (21:1) Gotoh tuner (the SD510/Delta) that is really nice. When I get back into playing my acoustic I'll probably drop a set of these in. They have become the "standard" tuners of a number of high end acoustic luthiers.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


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(@tmarius)
Eminent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 49
 

One thing you can do (if you don't now) is to always make sure to tune UP to a note and never DOWN. This ensures that all the gears are engaged to fight against string tension and so will prevent some detuning.

I remember reading about tuning up to a note years ago and have always done it since, I knew it helped keep the guitar in tune, but didnt know why or how! You learn something every day eh?


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